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Association between trauma and socioeconomic deprivation: a registry-based, Scotland-wide retrospective cohort study of 9,238 patients

Overview of attention for article published in Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, July 2016
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Title
Association between trauma and socioeconomic deprivation: a registry-based, Scotland-wide retrospective cohort study of 9,238 patients
Published in
Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, July 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13049-016-0275-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alasdair R. Corfield, Danny F. MacKay, Jill P. Pell

Abstract

Trauma remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the UK and throughout the world. Socioeconomic deprivation has been linked with many types of ill-health and previous studies have shown an association with injury in other parts of the world. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between socioeconomic deprivation and trauma incidence and case-fatality in Scotland. The study included nine thousand two hundred and thirty eight patients attending Emergency Departments following trauma across Scotland in 2011-12. A retrospective cohort study was conducted using secondary data extracted from the national trauma registry. Postcode of residence was used to generate deciles using the Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation. The incidence rate ratio (IRR) was calculated to allow comparison of incidence of trauma across SIMD deciles. For mortality, observed: expected ratios were obtained using observed mortality in the cohort and expected deaths using probability of survival based on Trauma and Injury Severity Score (TRISS) method. Compared with the most deprived decile, the least deprived had an incidence rate ratio (IRR) for all trauma of 0.43 (95 % CI 0.32-0.58, p < 0.001). The association was stronger for penetrating trauma (IRR 0.07, 95 % CI .01-0.56, p = 0.011). There was a significant interaction between age, gender and SIMD. For case fatality, multivariate logistic regression showed that, severity of trauma (ISS > 15) OR 18.11 (95 % CI 13.91 to 23.58) and type of injury (Penetrating versus blunt injury) OR 2.07 (95 % CI 1.15 to 3.72) remain as independent predictors of case fatality in this dataset. Our data shows a higher incidence of trauma amongst a socioeconomically deprived population, in keeping with other areas of the world. In our dataset, outcome, as measured by in-hospital mortality, does not appear to be associated with socioeconomic deprivation. In Scotland, populations living in socioeconomically deprived areas have a higher incidence of trauma, especially penetrating trauma, requiring hospital attendance. Case fatality is associated with more severe trauma and penetrating trauma, but not socioeconomic deprivation.

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 39 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 39 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 13 33%
Researcher 6 15%
Student > Bachelor 3 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 5%
Other 2 5%
Other 6 15%
Unknown 7 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 17 44%
Social Sciences 4 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 3%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 10 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 July 2016.
All research outputs
#10,785,970
of 13,551,872 outputs
Outputs from Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine
#764
of 860 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#184,995
of 262,537 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,551,872 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
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