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Antibiotic-associated dysbiosis affects the ability of the gut microbiota to control intestinal inflammation upon fecal microbiota transplantation in experimental colitis models

Overview of attention for article published in Microbiome, February 2021
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
1 blog
twitter
17 tweeters
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
5 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
42 Mendeley
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Title
Antibiotic-associated dysbiosis affects the ability of the gut microbiota to control intestinal inflammation upon fecal microbiota transplantation in experimental colitis models
Published in
Microbiome, February 2021
DOI 10.1186/s40168-020-00991-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Francesco Strati, Meritxell Pujolassos, Claudia Burrello, Maria Rita Giuffrè, Georgia Lattanzi, Flavio Caprioli, Jacopo Troisi, Federica Facciotti

Abstract

The gut microbiota plays a central role in host physiology and in several pathological mechanisms in humans. Antibiotics compromise the composition and functions of the gut microbiota inducing long-lasting detrimental effects on the host. Recent studies suggest that the efficacy of different clinical therapies depends on the action of the gut microbiota. Here, we investigated how different antibiotic treatments affect the ability of the gut microbiota to control intestinal inflammation upon fecal microbiota transplantation in an experimental colitis model and in ex vivo experiments with human intestinal biopsies. Murine fecal donors were pre-treated with different antibiotics, i.e., vancomycin, streptomycin, and metronidazole before FMT administration to colitic animals. The analysis of the gut microbiome, fecal metabolome, and the immunophenotyping of colonic lamina propria immune cells revealed that antibiotic pre-treatment significantly influences the capability of the microbiota to control intestinal inflammation. Streptomycin and vancomycin-treated microbiota failed to control intestinal inflammation and were characterized by the blooming of pathobionts previously associated with IBD as well as with metabolites related to the presence of oxidative stress and metabolism of simple sugars. On the contrary, the metronidazole-treated microbiota retained its ability to control inflammation co-occurring with the enrichment of Lactobacillus and of innate immune responses involving iNKT cells. Furthermore, ex vivo cultures of human intestinal lamina propria mononuclear cells and iNKT cell clones from IBD patients with vancomycin pre-treated sterile fecal water showed a Th1/Th17 skewing in CD4+ T-cell populations; metronidazole, on the other hand, induced the polarization of iNKT cells toward the production of IL10. Diverse antibiotic regimens affect the ability of the gut microbiota to control intestinal inflammation in experimental colitis by altering the microbial community structure and microbiota-derived metabolites. Video Abstract.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 17 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 42 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 42 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 6 14%
Researcher 5 12%
Student > Master 4 10%
Other 3 7%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 5%
Other 3 7%
Unknown 19 45%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Immunology and Microbiology 5 12%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 12%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 10%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 2%
Other 2 5%
Unknown 23 55%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 27. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 August 2021.
All research outputs
#1,004,804
of 19,152,125 outputs
Outputs from Microbiome
#340
of 1,157 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#29,401
of 375,960 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Microbiome
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,152,125 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,157 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 40.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 375,960 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them