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Impact of neighborhood resources on cardiovascular disease: a nationwide six-year follow-up

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, July 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (55th percentile)

Mentioned by

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6 tweeters

Citations

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12 Dimensions

Readers on

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144 Mendeley
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Title
Impact of neighborhood resources on cardiovascular disease: a nationwide six-year follow-up
Published in
BMC Public Health, July 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12889-016-3293-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Susanna Calling, Xinjun Li, Naomi Kawakami, Tsuyoshi Hamano, Kristina Sundquist

Abstract

Living in a socially deprived neighborhood is associated with lifestyle risk factors, e.g., smoking, physical inactivity and unhealthy diet, as well as an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, i.e., coronary heart disease and stroke. The aim was to study whether the odds of cardiovascular disease vary with the neighbourhood availability of potentially health-damaging and health-promoting resources. A nationwide sample of 2 040 826 men and 2 153 426 women aged 35-80 years were followed for six years for first hospitalization of coronary heart disease or stroke. Neighborhood availability of health-damaging resources (i.e., fast-food restaurants and bars/pubs) and health-promoting resources (i.e., health care facilities and physical activity facilities) were determined by use of geographic information systems (GIS). We found small or modestly increased odds ratios (ORs) for both coronary heart disease and stroke, related to the availability of both health-damaging and health-promoting resources. For example, in women, the unadjusted OR (95 % confidence interval) for stroke in relation to availability of fast-food restaurants was 1.18 (1.15-1.21). Similar patterns were observed in men, with an OR = 1.08 (1.05-1.10). However, the associations became weaker or disappeared after adjustment for neighborhood-level deprivation and individual-level age and income. This six year follow-up study shows that neighborhood availability of potentially health-damaging as well as health-promoting resources may make a small contribution to the risk of coronary heart disease and stroke. However, most of these associations were attenuated or disappeared after adjustment for neighborhood-level deprivation and individual-level age and income. Future studies are needed to further examine factors in the causal pathway between neighborhood deprivation and cardiovascular disease.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 144 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 144 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 12 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 8%
Student > Bachelor 10 7%
Researcher 10 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 3%
Other 12 8%
Unknown 84 58%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 17 12%
Nursing and Health Professions 14 10%
Social Sciences 8 6%
Psychology 5 3%
Sports and Recreations 3 2%
Other 11 8%
Unknown 86 60%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 August 2016.
All research outputs
#10,570,027
of 18,767,621 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#7,783
of 12,431 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#119,883
of 273,271 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#10
of 11 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,767,621 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 12,431 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.2. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 273,271 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 11 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.