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Ebola virus disease and critical illness

Overview of attention for article published in Critical Care, July 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (73rd percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
20 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages

Readers on

mendeley
216 Mendeley
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Title
Ebola virus disease and critical illness
Published in
Critical Care, July 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13054-016-1325-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Aleksandra Leligdowicz, William A. Fischer, Timothy M. Uyeki, Thomas E. Fletcher, Neill K. J. Adhikari, Gina Portella, Francois Lamontagne, Christophe Clement, Shevin T. Jacob, Lewis Rubinson, Abel Vanderschuren, Jan Hajek, Srinivas Murthy, Mauricio Ferri, Ian Crozier, Elhadj Ibrahima, Marie-Claire Lamah, John S. Schieffelin, David Brett-Major, Daniel G. Bausch, Nikki Shindo, Adrienne K. Chan, Tim O’Dempsey, Sharmistha Mishra, Michael Jacobs, Stuart Dickson, G. Marshall Lyon, Robert A. Fowler

Abstract

As of 20 May 2016 there have been 28,646 cases and 11,323 deaths resulting from the West African Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak reported to the World Health Organization. There continue to be sporadic flare-ups of EVD cases in West Africa.EVD presentation is nonspecific and characterized initially by onset of fatigue, myalgias, arthralgias, headache, and fever; this is followed several days later by anorexia, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal pain. Anorexia and gastrointestinal losses lead to dehydration, electrolyte abnormalities, and metabolic acidosis, and, in some patients, acute kidney injury. Hypoxia and ventilation failure occurs most often with severe illness and may be exacerbated by substantial fluid requirements for intravascular volume repletion and some degree of systemic capillary leak. Although minor bleeding manifestations are common, hypovolemic and septic shock complicated by multisystem organ dysfunction appear the most frequent causes of death.Males and females have been equally affected, with children (0-14 years of age) accounting for 19 %, young adults (15-44 years) 58 %, and older adults (≥45 years) 23 % of reported cases. While the current case fatality proportion in West Africa is approximately 40 %, it has varied substantially over time (highest near the outbreak onset) according to available resources (40-90 % mortality in West Africa compared to under 20 % in Western Europe and the USA), by age (near universal among neonates and high among older adults), and by Ebola viral load at admission.While there is no Ebola virus-specific therapy proven to be effective in clinical trials, mortality has been dramatically lower among EVD patients managed with supportive intensive care in highly resourced settings, allowing for the avoidance of hypovolemia, correction of electrolyte and metabolic abnormalities, and the provision of oxygen, ventilation, vasopressors, and dialysis when indicated. This experience emphasizes that, in addition to evaluating specific medical treatments, improving the global capacity to provide supportive critical care to patients with EVD may be the greatest opportunity to improve patient outcomes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 20 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 216 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Sierra Leone 1 <1%
Unknown 215 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 40 19%
Researcher 26 12%
Other 23 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 23 11%
Student > Bachelor 16 7%
Other 42 19%
Unknown 46 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 74 34%
Nursing and Health Professions 19 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 15 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 4%
Social Sciences 6 3%
Other 33 15%
Unknown 60 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 21. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 March 2020.
All research outputs
#1,453,761
of 21,750,593 outputs
Outputs from Critical Care
#1,321
of 5,872 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#26,068
of 280,562 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Critical Care
#14
of 49 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,750,593 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,872 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 18.9. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 280,562 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 49 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.