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Ugandan stakeholder hopes and concerns about gene drive mosquitoes for malaria control: new directions for gene drive risk governance

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, March 2021
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
3 news outlets
twitter
20 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
11 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
38 Mendeley
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Title
Ugandan stakeholder hopes and concerns about gene drive mosquitoes for malaria control: new directions for gene drive risk governance
Published in
Malaria Journal, March 2021
DOI 10.1186/s12936-021-03682-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sarah Hartley, Robert D. J. Smith, Adam Kokotovich, Chris Opesen, Tibebu Habtewold, Katie Ledingham, Ben Raymond, Charles B. Rwabukwali

Abstract

The African Union's High-Level Panel on Emerging Technologies identified gene drive mosquitoes as a priority technology for malaria elimination. The first field trials are expected in 5-10 years in Uganda, Mali or Burkina Faso. In preparation, regional and international actors are developing risk governance guidelines which will delineate the framework for identifying and evaluating risks. Scientists and bioethicists have called for African stakeholder involvement in these developments, arguing the knowledge and perspectives of those people living in malaria-afflicted countries is currently missing. However, few African stakeholders have been involved to date, leaving a knowledge gap about the local social-cultural as well as ecological context in which gene drive mosquitoes will be tested and deployed. This study investigates and analyses Ugandan stakeholders' hopes and concerns about gene drive mosquitoes for malaria control and explores the new directions needed for risk governance. This qualitative study draws on 19 in-depth semi-structured interviews with Ugandan stakeholders in 2019. It explores their hopes for the technology and the risks they believed pertinent. Coding began at a workshop and continued through thematic analysis. Participants' hopes and concerns for gene drive mosquitoes to address malaria fell into three themes: (1) ability of gene drive mosquitoes to prevent malaria infection; (2) impacts of gene drive testing and deployment; and, (3) governance. Stakeholder hopes fell almost exclusively into the first theme while concerns were spread across all three. The study demonstrates that local stakeholders are able and willing to contribute relevant and important knowledge to the development of risk frameworks. International processes can provide high-level guidelines, but risk decision-making must be grounded in the local context if it is to be robust, meaningful and legitimate. Decisions about whether or not to release gene drive mosquitoes as part of a malaria control programme will need to consider the assessment of both the risks and the benefits of gene drive mosquitoes within a particular social, political, ecological, and technological context. Just as with risks, benefits-and importantly, the conditions that are necessary to realize them-must be identified and debated in Uganda and its neighbouring countries.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 20 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 38 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 38 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 5 13%
Student > Master 5 13%
Researcher 5 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 8%
Lecturer 2 5%
Other 5 13%
Unknown 13 34%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 8%
Social Sciences 2 5%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 5%
Other 7 18%
Unknown 15 39%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 38. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 June 2022.
All research outputs
#835,748
of 21,340,745 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#124
of 5,327 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#22,734
of 323,319 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#1
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,340,745 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,327 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 323,319 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them