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Evaluating medical education regulation changes in Brazil: workforce impact

Overview of attention for article published in Human Resources for Health, March 2021
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (65th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
7 tweeters

Citations

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3 Dimensions

Readers on

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32 Mendeley
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Title
Evaluating medical education regulation changes in Brazil: workforce impact
Published in
Human Resources for Health, March 2021
DOI 10.1186/s12960-021-00580-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alexandre Medeiros Figueiredo, Danette Waller McKinley, Adriano Massuda, George Dantas Azevedo

Abstract

Shortages and inequitable distribution of physicians is an obstacle to move towards Universal Health Coverage, especially in low-income and middle-income countries. In Brazil, expansion of medical school enrollment, curricula changes and recruitment programs were established to increase the number of physicians in underserved areas. This study seeks to analyze the impact of these measures in reduce inequities in access to medical education and physicians' distribution. This is an observational study that analyzes changes in the number of undergraduate medical places and number of physicians per inhabitants in different areas in Brazil between the years 2010 and 2018. Data regarding the number of undergraduate medical places, number and the practice location of physicians were obtained in public databases. Municipalities with less than 20,000 inhabitants were considered underserved areas. Data regarding access to antenatal visits were analyzed as a proxy for impact in access to healthcare. From 2010 to 2018, 19,519 new medical undergraduate places were created which represents an increase of 120.2%. The increase in the number of physicians engaged in the workforce throughout the period was 113,702 physicians, 74,771 of these physicians in the Unified Health System. The greatest increase in the physicians per 1000 inhabitants ratio in the municipalities with the smallest population, the lowest Gross Domestic Product per capita and in those located in the states with the lowest concentration of physicians occurred in the 2013-2015 period. Increase in physician supply improved access to antenatal care. There was an expansion in the number of undergraduate medical places and medical workforce in all groups of municipalities assessed in Brazil. Medical undergraduate places expansion in the federal public schools was more efficient to reduce regional inequities in access to medical education than private sector expansion. The recruitment component of More Doctors for Brazil Program demonstrated effectiveness to increase the number of physicians in underserved areas. Our results indicate the importance of public policies to face inequities in access to medical education and physician shortages and the necessity of continuous assessment during the period of implementation, especially in the context of political and economic changes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 32 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 32 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 5 16%
Professor 3 9%
Other 2 6%
Student > Postgraduate 2 6%
Researcher 2 6%
Other 3 9%
Unknown 15 47%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 8 25%
Social Sciences 4 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 9%
Sports and Recreations 1 3%
Unspecified 1 3%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 14 44%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 March 2021.
All research outputs
#5,593,093
of 20,984,993 outputs
Outputs from Human Resources for Health
#606
of 1,081 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#109,575
of 322,286 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Human Resources for Health
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,984,993 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,081 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.4. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 322,286 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them