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“Did you ever drink more?” A detailed description of pregnant women’s drinking patterns

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, August 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
7 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
policy
1 policy source
twitter
16 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
71 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
109 Mendeley
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Title
“Did you ever drink more?” A detailed description of pregnant women’s drinking patterns
Published in
BMC Public Health, August 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12889-016-3354-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Evelyne Muggli, Colleen O’Leary, Susan Donath, Francesca Orsini, Della Forster, Peter J. Anderson, Sharon Lewis, Catherine Nagle, Jeffrey M. Craig, Elizabeth Elliott, Jane Halliday

Abstract

This paper presents drinking patterns in a prospective study of a population-based cohort of 1570 pregnant women using a combination of dose and timing to give best estimates of prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE). Novel assessments include women's special occasion drinking and alcohol use prior to pregnancy recognition. Information on up to nine types of alcoholic drink, with separate frequencies and volumes, including drinking on special occasions outside a 'usual' pattern, was collected for the periconceptional period and at four pregnancy time points. Weekly total and maximum alcohol consumption on any one occasion was calculated and categorised. Drinking patterns are described in the context of predictive maternal characteristics. 41.3 % of women did not drink during pregnancy, 27 % drank in first trimester only; most of whom stopped once they realised they were pregnant (87 %). When compared to women who abstained from alcohol when pregnant, those who drank in the first trimester only were more likely to have an unplanned pregnancy and not feel the effects of alcohol quickly. Almost a third of women continued to drink alcohol at some level throughout pregnancy (27 %), around half of whom never drank more than at low or moderate levels. When compared with abstainers and to women who only drank in trimester one, those who drank throughout pregnancy tended to be in their early to mid-thirties, smoke, have a higher income and educational attainment. Overall, almost one in five women (18.5 %) binge drank prior to pregnancy recognition, a third of whom were identified with a question about 'special occasion' drinking. Women whose age at first intoxication was less than 18 years (the legal drinking age in Australia), were significantly more likely to drink in pregnancy and at binge levels prior to pregnancy recognition. We have identified characteristics of pregnant women who either abstain, drink until pregnancy awareness or drink throughout pregnancy. These may assist in targeting strategies to enhance adherence to an abstinence policy and ultimately allow for appropriate follow-up and interpretation of adverse child outcomes. Our methodology also produced important information to reduce misclassification of occasional binge drinking episodes and ensure clearly defined comparison groups.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 16 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 109 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 109 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 17 16%
Student > Bachelor 15 14%
Researcher 10 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 6%
Other 22 20%
Unknown 30 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 21 19%
Nursing and Health Professions 13 12%
Social Sciences 13 12%
Psychology 7 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 6%
Other 16 15%
Unknown 33 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 82. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 June 2019.
All research outputs
#407,978
of 21,740,538 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#362
of 14,090 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#8,775
of 281,056 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#1
of 11 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,740,538 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 14,090 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 281,056 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 11 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.