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Developmental delay and failure to thrive in a 7-month-old baby boy with spontaneous transient Graves’ thyrotoxicosis: a case report

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Medical Case Reports, August 2016
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Title
Developmental delay and failure to thrive in a 7-month-old baby boy with spontaneous transient Graves’ thyrotoxicosis: a case report
Published in
Journal of Medical Case Reports, August 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13256-016-1013-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Shuichi Yatsuga, Tomoko Saikusa, Takako Sasaki, Kikumi Ushijima, Miyuki Kitamura, Junko Nishioka, Yasutoshi Koga

Abstract

Thyroid dysfunction can induce developmental delay and failure to thrive in infancy. Congenital hypothyroidism is one of the common causes of these symptoms in infancy. By contrast, hyperthyroidism is a rare cause of these symptoms in infancy. A 7-month-old Japanese baby boy was examined for developmental delay and failure to thrive. Blood tests were performed, which showed low levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone (<0.01 μU/mL) and high levels of free thyroxine (2.14 pg/mL). He was referred to our hospital at 8 months of age. His height was 64 cm (-2.7 standard deviation) and his weight was 6085 g (-2.5 standard deviation). No goiter was detected on examination. His thyrotropin receptor antibody was slightly high (3.9 IU/L), whereas thyroid stimulating antibody, anti-thyroglobulin antibody, and thyroid peroxidase antibody were within normal range. These blood findings indicated hyperthyroidism, most likely Graves' disease. His free thyroxine level decreased in the first month after our examination. No increased vascularity of his thyroid gland was noted. The technetium uptake of his thyroid gland in scintigraphy was relatively increased compared to the intake of his salivary gland. We elected to observe rather than treat with anti-thyroid medications. We have to rule out spontaneous transient Graves' thyrotoxicosis when babies have symptoms of developmental delay and fail to thrive.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 15 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 15 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 2 13%
Researcher 2 13%
Student > Bachelor 2 13%
Student > Master 2 13%
Lecturer 1 7%
Other 1 7%
Unknown 5 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 33%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 7%
Psychology 1 7%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 7%
Social Sciences 1 7%
Other 1 7%
Unknown 5 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 August 2016.
All research outputs
#9,071,166
of 11,329,665 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Medical Case Reports
#934
of 1,684 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#186,254
of 264,665 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Medical Case Reports
#33
of 78 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,329,665 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,684 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.4. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,665 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 78 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.