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Preparing a neuropediatric upper limb exergame rehabilitation system for home-use: a feasibility study

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation, January 2016
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1 peer review site

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202 Mendeley
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Title
Preparing a neuropediatric upper limb exergame rehabilitation system for home-use: a feasibility study
Published in
Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12984-016-0141-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gerber, Corinna N, Kunz, Bettina, van Hedel, Hubertus J A, Corinna N. Gerber, Bettina Kunz, Hubertus J. A. van Hedel

Abstract

Home-based, computer-enhanced therapy of hand and arm function can complement conventional interventions and increase the amount and intensity of training, without interfering too much with family routines. The objective of the present study was to investigate the feasibility and usability of the new portable version of the YouGrabber® system (YouRehab AG, Zurich, Switzerland) in the home setting. Fifteen families of children (7 girls, mean age: 11.3y) with neuromotor disorders and affected upper limbs participated. They received instructions and took the system home to train for 2 weeks. After returning it, they answered questions about usability, motivation, and their general opinion of the system (Visual Analogue Scale; 0 indicating worst score, 100 indicating best score; ≤30 not satisfied, 31-69 average, ≥70 satisfied). Furthermore, total pure playtime and number of training sessions were quantified. To prove the usability of the system, number and sort of support requests were logged. The usability of the system was considered average to satisfying (mean 60.1-93.1). The lowest score was given for the occurrence of technical errors. Parents had to motivate their children to start (mean 66.5) and continue (mean 68.5) with the training. But in general, parents estimated the therapeutic benefit as high (mean 73.1) and the whole system as very good (mean 87.4). Children played on average 7 times during the 2 weeks; total pure playtime was 185 ± 45 min. Especially at the beginning of the trial, systems were very error-prone. Fortunately, we, or the company, solved most problems before the patients took the systems home. Nevertheless, 10 of 15 families contacted us at least once because of technical problems. Despite that the YouGrabber® is a promising and highly accepted training tool for home-use, currently, it is still error-prone, and the requested support exceeds the support that can be provided by clinical therapists. A technically more robust system, combined with additional attractive games, likely results in higher patient motivation and better compliance. This would reduce the need for parents to motivate their children extrinsically and allow for clinical trials to investigate the effectiveness of the system. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02368223.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 202 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 202 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 36 18%
Student > Bachelor 28 14%
Researcher 26 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 25 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 14 7%
Other 29 14%
Unknown 44 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 35 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 28 14%
Engineering 22 11%
Sports and Recreations 12 6%
Social Sciences 10 5%
Other 42 21%
Unknown 53 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 August 2016.
All research outputs
#4,116,096
of 8,200,733 outputs
Outputs from Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation
#256
of 482 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#129,554
of 257,427 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation
#15
of 19 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,200,733 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 482 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.0. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 257,427 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 19 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.