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A review of African horse sickness and its implications for Ireland

Overview of attention for article published in Irish Veterinary Journal, July 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (52nd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (60th percentile)

Mentioned by

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2 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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21 Dimensions

Readers on

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82 Mendeley
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Title
A review of African horse sickness and its implications for Ireland
Published in
Irish Veterinary Journal, July 2012
DOI 10.1186/2046-0481-65-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Geoffrey M Thompson, Stephen Jess, Archie K Murchie

Abstract

African horse sickness is an economically highly important non-contagious but infectious Orbivirus disease that is transmitted by various species of Culicoides midges. The equids most severely affected by the virus are horses, ponies, and European donkeys; mules are somewhat less susceptible, and African donkeys and zebra are refractory to the devastating consequences of infection. In recent years, Bluetongue virus, an Orbivirus similar to African horse sickness, which also utilises Culicoides spp. as its vector, has drastically increased its range into previously unaffected regions in northern Europe, utilising indigenous vector species, and causing widespread economic damage to the agricultural sector. Considering these events, the current review outlines the history of African horse sickness, including information concerning virus structure, transmission, viraemia, overwintering ability, and the potential implications that an outbreak would have for Ireland. While the current risk for the introduction of African horse sickness to Ireland is considered at worst 'very low', it is important to note that prior to the 2006 outbreak of Bluetongue in northern Europe, both diseases were considered to be of equal risk to the United Kingdom ('medium-risk'). It is therefore likely that any outbreak of this disease would have serious socio-economic consequences for Ireland due to the high density of vulnerable equids and the prevalence of Culicoides species, potentially capable of vectoring the virus.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 82 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 1%
Unknown 81 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 14 17%
Researcher 13 16%
Student > Bachelor 11 13%
Student > Postgraduate 7 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 9%
Other 17 21%
Unknown 13 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 26 32%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 19 23%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 6%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 2%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 2%
Other 7 9%
Unknown 21 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 March 2015.
All research outputs
#7,017,405
of 12,434,464 outputs
Outputs from Irish Veterinary Journal
#54
of 146 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#65,956
of 140,898 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Irish Veterinary Journal
#2
of 5 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,434,464 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 146 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 140,898 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 3 of them.