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Molecular diagnosis and genetic diversity of tick-borne Anaplasmataceae agents infecting the African buffalo Syncerus caffer from Marromeu Reserve in Mozambique

Overview of attention for article published in Parasites & Vectors, August 2016
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Title
Molecular diagnosis and genetic diversity of tick-borne Anaplasmataceae agents infecting the African buffalo Syncerus caffer from Marromeu Reserve in Mozambique
Published in
Parasites & Vectors, August 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13071-016-1715-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rosangela Zacarias Machado, Marta Maria Geraldes Teixeira, Adriana Carlos Rodrigues, Marcos Rogério André, Luiz Ricardo Gonçalves, Jenevaldo Barbosa da Silva, Carlos Lopes Pereira

Abstract

Tick-borne diseases (TBDs) are very important in relation to domestic ruminants, but their occurrence among wild ruminants, mainly in the African buffalo Syncerus caffer, remains little known. Molecular diagnostic methods were applied to detect Anaplasma marginale, Anaplasma centrale, Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Ehrlichia ruminantium and Ehrlichia chaffeensis in 97 blood samples of African buffalo captured at the Marromeu Reserve in Mozambique. Molecular detection of agents belonging to the family Anaplasmataceae were based on conventional and qPCR assays based on msp5, groEL, 16S rRNA, msp2, pCS20 and vlpt genes. Phylogenetic reconstruction of new Anaplasma isolates detected in African buffalo was evaluated based on msp5, groEL and 16S rRNA genes. All the animals evaluated were negative for specific PCR assays for A. phagocytophilum, E. ruminantium and E. chaffeensis, but 70 animals were positive for A. marginale, showing 2.69 × 10(0) up to 2.00 × 10(5) msp1β copies/μl. This result overcomes the conventional PCR for A. marginale based on msp5 gene that detected only 65 positive samples. Sequencing and phylogenetic analyses were performed for selected positive samples based on the genes msp5, groEL and 16S rRNA. Trees inferred using different methods separated the 29 msp5 sequences from buffalo in two distinct groups, assigned to A. centrale and A. marginale. The groEL sequences determined for African buffalo samples revealed to be more heterogeneous and inferred trees could not assign them to any species of Anaplasma despite being more related to A. marginale and A. centrale. The highly conserved 16S rRNA gene sequences suggested a close relationship of the new 16 sequences with A. centrale/A. marginale, A. platys and A. phagocytophilum. Our analysis suggests that different species of Anaplasma are simultaneously present in the African buffalo. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study that diagnosed Anaplasma spp. in the African buffalo and inferred the taxonomic status of new isolates with different gene sequences. The small fragment of msp5 sequences revealed to be a good target for phylogenetic positioning of new Anaplasma spp. isolates.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 54 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 54 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 10 19%
Researcher 8 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 15%
Student > Postgraduate 4 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 4%
Other 6 11%
Unknown 16 30%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 11 20%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 20%
Immunology and Microbiology 4 7%
Environmental Science 2 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 2%
Other 5 9%
Unknown 20 37%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 August 2016.
All research outputs
#7,131,228
of 8,243,836 outputs
Outputs from Parasites & Vectors
#1,953
of 2,291 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#214,391
of 253,828 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Parasites & Vectors
#121
of 129 outputs
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