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Prospective observational cohort study of Health Related Quality of Life (HRQOL), chronic foot problems and their determinants in gout: a research protocol

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, November 2012
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Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
15 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
47 Mendeley
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Title
Prospective observational cohort study of Health Related Quality of Life (HRQOL), chronic foot problems and their determinants in gout: a research protocol
Published in
BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, November 2012
DOI 10.1186/1471-2474-13-219
Pubmed ID
Authors

Priyanka Chandratre, Christian Mallen, Jane Richardson, Keith Rome, Joanne Bailey, Rajvinder Gill, Samantha Hider, Jane Mason, Zoe Mayson, Sara Muller, Charlotte Purcell, Jennifer Titley, Simon Wathall, Irena Zwierska, Edward Roddy

Abstract

Gout is the commonest inflammatory arthritis affecting around 1.4% of adults in Europe. It is predominantly managed in primary care and classically affects the joints of the foot, particularly the first metatarsophalangeal joint. Gout related factors (including disease characteristics and treatment) as well as comorbid chronic disease are associated with poor Health Related Quality of Life (HRQOL) yet to date there is limited evidence concerning gout in a community setting. Existing epidemiological studies are limited by their cross-sectional design, selection of secondary care patients with atypical disease and the use of generic tools to measure HRQOL. This 3 year primary care-based prospective observational cohort study will describe the spectrum of HRQOL in community dwelling patients with gout, associated factors, predictors of poor outcome, and prevalence and incidence of foot problems in gout patients.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 47 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
Unknown 46 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 10 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 11%
Professor > Associate Professor 4 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 9%
Student > Bachelor 4 9%
Other 14 30%
Unknown 6 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 19 40%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 13%
Social Sciences 4 9%
Psychology 3 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 4%
Other 5 11%
Unknown 8 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 November 2012.
All research outputs
#7,978,779
of 13,247,396 outputs
Outputs from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#1,529
of 2,633 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#61,149
of 116,648 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#135
of 211 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,247,396 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,633 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 116,648 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 211 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.