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Prolactin-induced PAK1 tyrosyl phosphorylation promotes FAK dephosphorylation, breast cancer cell motility, invasion and metastasis

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Cell Biology, August 2016
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Title
Prolactin-induced PAK1 tyrosyl phosphorylation promotes FAK dephosphorylation, breast cancer cell motility, invasion and metastasis
Published in
BMC Cell Biology, August 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12860-016-0109-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alan Hammer, Maria Diakonova

Abstract

The serine/threonine kinase PAK1 is an important regulator of cell motility. Both PAK1 and the hormone/cytokine prolactin (PRL) have been implicated in breast cancer cell motility, however, the exact mechanisms guiding PRL/PAK1 signaling in breast cancer cells have not been fully elucidated. Our lab has previously demonstrated that PRL-activated tyrosine kinase JAK2 phosphorylates PAK1 on tyrosines 153, 201, and 285, and that tyrosyl phosphorylated PAK1 (pTyr-PAK1) augments migration and invasion of breast cancer cells. Here we further investigate the mechanisms by which pTyr-PAK1 enhances breast cancer cell motility in response to PRL. We demonstrate a distinct reduction in PRL-induced FAK auto-phosphorylation in T47D and TMX2-28 breast cancer cells overexpressing wild-type PAK1 (PAK1 WT) when compared to cells overexpressing either GFP or phospho-tyrosine-deficient mutant PAK1 (PAK1 Y3F). Furthermore, pTyr-PAK1 phosphorylates MEK1 on Ser298 resulting in subsequent ERK1/2 activation. PRL-induced FAK auto-phosphorylation is rescued in PAK1 WT cells by inhibiting tyrosine phosphatases and tyrosine phosphatase inhibition abrogates cell motility and invasion in response to PRL. siRNA-mediated knockdown of the tyrosine phosphatase PTP-PEST rescues FAK auto-phosphorylation in PAK1 WT cells and reduces both cell motility and invasion. Finally, we provide evidence that PRL-induced pTyr-PAK1 stimulates tumor cell metastasis in vivo. These data provide insight into the mechanisms guiding PRL-mediated breast cancer cell motility and invasion and highlight a significant role for pTyr-PAK1 in breast cancer metastasis.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 12 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 12 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Doctoral Student 4 33%
Student > Master 4 33%
Student > Bachelor 2 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 8%
Researcher 1 8%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 50%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 17%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 8%
Social Sciences 1 8%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 8%
Other 1 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 August 2016.
All research outputs
#7,140,002
of 8,255,097 outputs
Outputs from BMC Cell Biology
#172
of 213 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#214,237
of 253,888 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Cell Biology
#4
of 4 outputs
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