↓ Skip to main content

The impact of different types of parental support behaviours on child physical activity, healthy eating, and screen time: a cross-sectional study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, August 2016
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#22 of 13,600)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
86 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
27 tweeters
facebook
6 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
80 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
361 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
The impact of different types of parental support behaviours on child physical activity, healthy eating, and screen time: a cross-sectional study
Published in
BMC Public Health, August 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12889-016-3245-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Evelyn Pyper, Daniel Harrington, Heather Manson

Abstract

In Canada, 31.5 % of children are overweight or obese, putting them at an increased risk of chronic co-morbidities and premature mortality. Physical activity, healthy eating, and screen time are important behavioural determinants of childhood overweight and obesity that are influenced by the family environment, and particularly parents' support behaviours. However, there is currently a limited understanding of which types of these support behaviours have the greatest positive impact on healthy child behaviours. This study aims to determine the relative contribution of different types of parental support behaviours for predicting the likelihood that children meet established guidelines for daily physical activity, daily fruit and vegetable consumption, and recreational screen time. A Computer Assisted Telephone Interview survey was used to collect data from a random sample of parents or guardians with at least one child under the age of 18 in Ontario (n = 3,206). Three multivariable logistic regression models were built to predict whether or not parents reported their child was meeting guidelines. Independent variables included parent and child age and gender, multiple indicators of parental support behaviours, and socio-demographic characteristics. Parental support behaviours were categorized post-hoc as motivational, instrumental, regulatory, and conditional based on an adapted framework. Controlling for all other factors in the model, several parental support behaviours were found to be significant predictors of children meeting established health guidelines. For example, conditional support behaviours including taking the child to places where they can be active (OR: 2.06; 95 % CI: 1.32-3.21), and eating meals as a family away from the TV (95 % CI: 1.15-2.41) were significant positive predictors of children meeting physical activity and fruit and vegetable guidelines, respectively. Health promotion efforts aimed at improving particular parent support behaviours could be effective levers for mitigating the burden of excess body weight in childhood. As such, the influence of support behaviours should be fully considered in any comprehensive approach to prevention and reduction of childhood overweight and obesity.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 27 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 361 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Mexico 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Unknown 359 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 72 20%
Student > Master 63 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 30 8%
Researcher 23 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 23 6%
Other 59 16%
Unknown 91 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 61 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 37 10%
Sports and Recreations 34 9%
Social Sciences 32 9%
Psychology 29 8%
Other 60 17%
Unknown 108 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 692. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 May 2020.
All research outputs
#20,708
of 20,984,993 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#22
of 13,600 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#457
of 285,996 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#1
of 17 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,984,993 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 13,600 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 285,996 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 17 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.