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The assessment and management of pain in patients with dementia in hospital settings: a multi-case exploratory study from a decision making perspective

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, August 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (75th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (66th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
11 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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44 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
242 Mendeley
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Title
The assessment and management of pain in patients with dementia in hospital settings: a multi-case exploratory study from a decision making perspective
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, August 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12913-016-1690-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Valentina Lichtner, Dawn Dowding, Nick Allcock, John Keady, Elizabeth L. Sampson, Michelle Briggs, Anne Corbett, Kirstin James, Reena Lasrado, Caroline Swarbrick, S. José Closs

Abstract

Pain is often poorly managed in people who have a dementia. Little is known about how this patient population is managed in hospital, with research to date focused mainly on care homes. This study aimed to investigate how pain is recognised, assessed and managed in patients with dementia in a range of acute hospital wards, to inform the development of a decision support tool to improve pain management for this group. A qualitative, multi-site exploratory case study. Data were collected in four hospitals in England and Scotland. Methods included non-participant observations, audits of patient records, semi-structured interviews with staff and carers, and analysis of hospital ward documents. Thematic analysis was performed through the lens of decision making theory. Staff generally relied on patients' self-report of pain. For patients with dementia, however, communication difficulties experienced because of their condition, the organisational context, and time frames of staff interactions, hindered patients' ability to provide staff with information about their pain experience. This potentially undermined the trials of medications used to provide pain relief to each patient and assessments of their responses to these treatments. Furthermore, given the multidisciplinary environment, a patient's communication about their pain involved several members of staff, each having to make sense of the patient's pain as in an 'overall picture'. Information about patients' pain, elicited in different ways, at different times and by different health care staff, was fragmented in paper-based documentation. Re-assembling the pieces to form a 'patient specific picture of the pain' required collective staff memory, 'mental computation' and time. There is a need for an efficient method of eliciting and centralizing all pain-related information for patients with dementia, which is distributed in time and between personnel. Such a method should give an overall picture of a patient's pain which is rapidly accessible to all involved in their care. This would provide a much-needed basis for making decisions to support the effective management of the pain of older people with dementia in hospital.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 11 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 242 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 240 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 40 17%
Student > Bachelor 40 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 31 13%
Researcher 17 7%
Student > Postgraduate 13 5%
Other 41 17%
Unknown 60 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 66 27%
Medicine and Dentistry 43 18%
Psychology 17 7%
Social Sciences 13 5%
Unspecified 7 3%
Other 31 13%
Unknown 65 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 December 2019.
All research outputs
#3,193,246
of 16,410,712 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#1,530
of 5,684 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#64,260
of 267,310 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#3
of 9 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,410,712 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 80th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,684 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.9. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,310 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 9 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 6 of them.