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Systematic review of management strategies to control chronic wasting disease in wild deer populations in North America

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Veterinary Research, January 2016
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2 tweeters

Citations

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34 Dimensions

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103 Mendeley
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Title
Systematic review of management strategies to control chronic wasting disease in wild deer populations in North America
Published in
BMC Veterinary Research, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12917-016-0804-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

F. D. Uehlinger, F. D. Uehlinger, A. C. Johnston, T. K. Bollinger, C. L. Waldner

Abstract

Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a contagious, fatal prion disease affecting cervids in a growing number of regions across North America. Projected deer population declines and concern about potential spread of CWD to other species warrant strategies to manage this disease. Control efforts to date have been largely unsuccessful, resulting in continuing spread and increasing prevalence. This systematic review summarizes peer-reviewed published reports describing field-applicable CWD control strategies in wild deer populations in North America using systematic review methods. Ten databases were searched for peer-reviewed literature. Following deduplication, relevance screening, full-text appraisal, subject matter expert review and qualitative data extraction, nine references were included describing four distinct management strategies. Six of the nine studies used predictive modeling to evaluate control strategies. All six demonstrated one or more interventions to be effective but results were dependant on parameters and assumptions used in the model. Three found preferential removal of CWD infected deer to be effective in reducing CWD prevalence; one model evaluated a test and slaughter strategy, the other selective removal of infected deer by predators and the third evaluated increased harvest of the sex with highest prevalence (males). Three models evaluated non-selective harvest of deer. There were only three reports that examined primary data collected as part of observational studies. Two of these studies supported the effectiveness of intensive non-selective culling; the third study did not find a difference between areas that were subjected to culling and those that were not. Seven of the nine studies were conducted in the United States. This review highlights the paucity of evaluated, field-applicable control strategies for CWD in wild deer populations. Knowledge gaps in the complex epidemiology of CWD and the intricacies inherent to prion diseases currently pose significant challenges to effective control of this disease in wild deer in North America.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 103 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 102 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 19 18%
Researcher 16 16%
Student > Bachelor 14 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 8%
Other 19 18%
Unknown 16 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 32 31%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 14 14%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 7%
Environmental Science 6 6%
Neuroscience 4 4%
Other 23 22%
Unknown 17 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 August 2016.
All research outputs
#5,991,477
of 8,286,032 outputs
Outputs from BMC Veterinary Research
#700
of 1,268 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#164,909
of 252,882 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Veterinary Research
#40
of 78 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,286,032 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,268 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.7. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 252,882 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 78 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.