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The in vivo reduction of afferent facilitation induced by low frequency electrical stimulation of the motor cortex is antagonized by cathodal direct current stimulation of the cerebellum

Overview of attention for article published in Cerebellum & Ataxias, August 2016
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Title
The in vivo reduction of afferent facilitation induced by low frequency electrical stimulation of the motor cortex is antagonized by cathodal direct current stimulation of the cerebellum
Published in
Cerebellum & Ataxias, August 2016
DOI 10.1186/s40673-016-0053-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nordeyn Oulad Ben Taib, Mario Manto

Abstract

Low-frequency electrical stimulation to the motor cortex (LFSMC) depresses the excitability of motor circuits by long-term depression (LTD)-like effects. The interactions between LFSMC and cathodal direct current stimulation (cDCS) over the cerebellum are unknown. We assessed the corticomotor responses and the afferent facilitation of corticomotor responses during a conditioning paradigm in anaesthetized rats. We applied LFSMC at a frequency of 1 Hz and a combination of LFSMC with cDCS. LFSMC significantly depressed both the corticomotor responses and the afferent facilitation of corticomotor responses. Simultaneous application of cDCS over the cerebellum antagonized the depression of corticomotor responses and cancelled the depression of the afferent facilitation. Our results demonstrate that cDCS of the cerebellum is a potent modulator the inhibition of the motor circuits induced by LFSMC applied in vivo. These results expand our understanding of the effects of cerebellar DCS on motor commands and open novel applications for a cerebellar remote control of LFSMC-induced neuroplasticity. We suggest that the cerebellum acts as a neuronal machine supervising not only long-term potentiation (LTP)-like effects, but also LTD-like effects in the motor cortex, two mechanisms which underlie cerebello-cerebral interactions and the cerebellar control of remote plasticity. Implications for clinical ataxiology are discussed.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 10 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 10%
Unknown 9 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Doctoral Student 3 30%
Student > Master 2 20%
Researcher 1 10%
Student > Postgraduate 1 10%
Unspecified 1 10%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 2 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 2 20%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 10%
Unspecified 1 10%
Neuroscience 1 10%
Computer Science 1 10%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 4 40%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 August 2016.
All research outputs
#6,303,722
of 8,307,635 outputs
Outputs from Cerebellum & Ataxias
#32
of 50 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#178,550
of 251,639 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cerebellum & Ataxias
#3
of 4 outputs
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