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Malaria in infants aged less than six months - is it an area of unmet medical need?

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, December 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (84th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
8 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
47 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
150 Mendeley
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Title
Malaria in infants aged less than six months - is it an area of unmet medical need?
Published in
Malaria Journal, December 2012
DOI 10.1186/1475-2875-11-400
Pubmed ID
Authors

Umberto D’Alessandro, David Ubben, Kamal Hamed, Serign Jawo Ceesay, Joseph Okebe, Makie Taal, Eugene Kaman Lama, Moussa Keita, Lamine Koivogui, Alain Nahum, Kalifa Bojang, Aja Adam Jagne Sonko, Honorat Francis Lalya, Bernard Brabin

Abstract

Despite the protection provided by several factors, including maternal antibodies, the burden of malaria in young infants may be higher than previously thought. Infants with congenital or neonatal malaria may have a different clinical presentation than older children, and diagnosis may be confused with other neonatal diseases due to an overlap of clinical manifestations. In addition, there is little information on the use of artemisinin-based combination therapy in young infants. There is the need for a more accurate estimate of the parasite prevalence and the incidence of clinical malaria in infants under 6 months old, as well as a better characterization of risk factors, pharmacokinetic profiles, safety and efficacy of currently available anti-malarial treatments, in order to develop evidence-based treatment guidelines for this population.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 150 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Indonesia 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Unknown 146 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 25 17%
Researcher 23 15%
Student > Postgraduate 21 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 19 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 10 7%
Other 28 19%
Unknown 24 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 57 38%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 22 15%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 4%
Social Sciences 6 4%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 4%
Other 21 14%
Unknown 32 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 July 2021.
All research outputs
#3,746,446
of 21,415,800 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#928
of 5,346 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#45,536
of 291,191 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#37
of 293 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,415,800 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 82nd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,346 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 291,191 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 293 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.