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Revisiting the pathogenesis of podagra: why does gout target the foot?

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Foot and Ankle Research, May 2011
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
1 blog
twitter
6 tweeters
googleplus
2 Google+ users
q&a
1 Q&A thread
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
57 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
72 Mendeley
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Title
Revisiting the pathogenesis of podagra: why does gout target the foot?
Published in
Journal of Foot and Ankle Research, May 2011
DOI 10.1186/1757-1146-4-13
Pubmed ID
Authors

Edward Roddy

Abstract

This invited paper provides a summary of a keynote lecture delivered at the 2011 Australasian Podiatry Conference. Gout is the most prevalent inflammatory arthropathy. It displays a striking predilection to affect the first metatarsophalangeal joint as well as joints within the mid-foot and ankle. A number of factors are known to reduce urate solubility and enhance nucleation of monosodium urate crystals including decreased temperature, lower pH and physical shock, all of which may be particularly relevant to crystal deposition in the foot. An association has also been proposed between monosodium urate crystal deposition and osteoarthritis, which also targets the first metatarsophalangeal joint. Cadaveric, clinical and radiographic studies indicate that monosodium urate crystals more readily deposit in osteoarthritic cartilage. Transient intra-articular hyperuricaemia and precipitation of monosodium urate crystals is thought to follow overnight resolution of synovial effusion within the osteoarthritic first metatarsophalangeal joint. The proclivity of gout for the first metatarsophalangeal joint is likely to be multi-factorial in origin, arising from the unique combination of the susceptibility of the joint to osteoarthritis and other determinants of urate solubility and crystal nucleation such as temperature and minor physical trauma which are particularly relevant to the foot.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 72 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 1%
Unknown 71 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 20 28%
Student > Master 11 15%
Researcher 7 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 10%
Student > Postgraduate 5 7%
Other 13 18%
Unknown 9 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 33 46%
Nursing and Health Professions 11 15%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 7%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 1%
Other 5 7%
Unknown 11 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 24. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 March 2021.
All research outputs
#1,011,084
of 17,838,103 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Foot and Ankle Research
#58
of 668 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#12,742
of 265,690 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Foot and Ankle Research
#2
of 42 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,838,103 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 668 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,690 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 42 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.