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Comparative analysis of complete mitochondrial genome sequences confirms independent origins of plant-parasitic nematodes

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, January 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (73rd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (60th percentile)

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7 tweeters

Citations

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43 Dimensions

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75 Mendeley
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Title
Comparative analysis of complete mitochondrial genome sequences confirms independent origins of plant-parasitic nematodes
Published in
BMC Evolutionary Biology, January 2013
DOI 10.1186/1471-2148-13-12
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tahera Sultana, Jiyeon Kim, Sang-Hwa Lee, Hyerim Han, Sanghee Kim, Gi-Sik Min, Steven A Nadler, Joogn-Ki Park

Abstract

The nematode infraorder Tylenchomorpha (Class Chromadorea) includes plant parasites that are of agricultural and economic importance, as well as insect-associates and fungal feeding species. Among tylenchomorph plant parasites, members of the superfamily Tylenchoidea, such as root-knot nematodes, have great impact on agriculture. Of the five superfamilies within Tylenchomorpha, one (Aphelenchoidea) includes mainly fungal-feeding species, but also some damaging plant pathogens, including certain Bursaphelenchus spp. The evolutionary relationships of tylenchoid and aphelenchoid nematodes have been disputed based on classical morphological features and molecular data. For example, similarities in the structure of the stomatostylet suggested a common evolutionary origin. In contrast, phylogenetic hypotheses based on nuclear SSU ribosomal DNA sequences have revealed paraphyly of Aphelenchoidea, with, for example, fungal-feeding Aphelenchus spp. within Tylenchomorpha, but Bursaphelenchus and Aphelenchoides spp. more closely related to infraorder Panagrolaimomorpha. We investigated phylogenetic relationships of plant-parasitic tylenchoid and aphelenchoid species in the context of other chromadorean nematodes based on comparative analysis of complete mitochondrial genome data, including two newly sequenced genomes from Bursaphelenchus xylophilus (Aphelenchoidea) and Pratylenchus vulnus (Tylenchoidea).

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 75 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 2 3%
United Kingdom 1 1%
Germany 1 1%
Taiwan 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Unknown 69 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 19 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 21%
Student > Master 11 15%
Professor > Associate Professor 6 8%
Student > Bachelor 5 7%
Other 13 17%
Unknown 5 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 54 72%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 10 13%
Environmental Science 2 3%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 1%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 1%
Other 4 5%
Unknown 3 4%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 January 2013.
All research outputs
#992,564
of 4,507,144 outputs
Outputs from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#548
of 1,431 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#74,774
of 285,136 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#28
of 75 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,507,144 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 77th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,431 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 285,136 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 75 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.