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A malariometric survey of under-fives residing in indoor residual spraying-implementing and non-implementing communities of Lagos, Nigeria

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, September 2016
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (58th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters

Citations

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8 Dimensions

Readers on

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69 Mendeley
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Title
A malariometric survey of under-fives residing in indoor residual spraying-implementing and non-implementing communities of Lagos, Nigeria
Published in
Malaria Journal, September 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12936-016-1507-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Babatunde A. Odugbemi, Kikelomo O. Wright, Adebayo T. Onajole, Yetunde A. Kuyinu, Olayinka O. Goodman, Tinuola O. Odugbemi, Olumuyiwa O. Odusanya

Abstract

Indoor residual spraying (IRS) is used as part of the integrated vector management strategy for the control of malaria in Lagos, Nigeria. The purpose of this study was to compare the malariometric indices of children under 5 years old living in IRS-implementing and non-IRS-implementing communities of Lagos, Nigeria. The study was a community-based, comparative, cross-sectional study of 480 children under five recruited using a multi-stage sampling method. Data on each child were collected using a household questionnaire administered to the consenting care-giver of each selected child. Each child underwent a comprehensive physical examination. On-the-spot malaria rapid diagnostic testing and haemoglobin estimation to assess parasitaemia and anaemia, respectively, were also carried out. Risk factors for parasitaemia and anaemia were identified using multivariate logistic regression. A total of 238 children were studied in the IRS-implementing group while 242 children were studied in the non-IRS-implementing group. The IRS -implementing community had a lower level of parasitaemia (1.3 %) compared to the non-IRS-implementing community (5.8 %) (p < 0.001). There was no significant difference in anaemia, spleen rate and fever in the IRS-implementing group (10.9, 9.7 and 5 %) and the non-IRS-implementing group (9.9, 8.8 and 8.7 %), respectively. Residing in an IRS-implementing community was associated with lower odds of parasitaemia (OR 0.17, p < 0.01). Sleeping under a bed net was the only factor associated with anaemia (p < 0.01). IRS has led to a reduction in the level of parasitaemia in the under-fives in the study areas.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 69 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 69 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 12 17%
Researcher 12 17%
Student > Bachelor 9 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 9%
Other 5 7%
Other 10 14%
Unknown 15 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 23 33%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 12%
Social Sciences 7 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 3%
Other 8 12%
Unknown 17 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 September 2016.
All research outputs
#6,696,795
of 12,440,886 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#2,073
of 3,646 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#107,731
of 261,962 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#59
of 112 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,440,886 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,646 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.3. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 261,962 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 112 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.