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Reconstituted high-density lipoproteins promote wound repair and blood flow recovery in response to ischemia in aged mice

Overview of attention for article published in Lipids in Health and Disease, September 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#48 of 714)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
1 blog
twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

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8 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
23 Mendeley
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Title
Reconstituted high-density lipoproteins promote wound repair and blood flow recovery in response to ischemia in aged mice
Published in
Lipids in Health and Disease, September 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12944-016-0322-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tania Tsatralis, Anisyah Ridiandries, Stacy Robertson, Laura Z. Vanags, Yuen Ting Lam, Joanne T. M. Tan, Martin K. C. Ng, Christina A. Bursill

Abstract

The average population age is increasing and the incidence of age-related vascular complications is rising in parallel. Impaired wound healing and disordered ischemia-mediated angiogenesis are key contributors to age-impaired vascular complications that can lead to amputation. High-density lipoproteins (HDL) have vasculo-protective properties and augment ischemia-driven angiogenesis in young animals. We aimed to determine the effect of reconstituted HDL (rHDL) on aged mice in a murine wound healing model and the hindlimb ischemia (HLI) model. Murine wound healing model-24-month-old aged mice received topical application of rHDL (50 μg/wound/day) or PBS (vehicle control) for 10 days following wounding. Murine HLI model-Femoral artery ligation was performed on 24-month-old mice. Mice received rHDL (40 mg/kg) or PBS, intravenously, on alternate days, 1 week pre-surgery and up to 21 days post ligation. For both models, blood flow perfusion was determined using laser Doppler perfusion imaging. Mice were sacrificed at 10 (wound healing) or 21 (HLI) days post-surgery and tissues were collected for histological and gene analyses. Daily topical application of rHDL increased the rate of wound closure by Day 7 post-wounding (25 %, p < 0.05). Wound blood perfusion, a marker of angiogenesis, was elevated in rHDL treated wounds (Days 4-10 by 22-25 %, p < 0.05). In addition, rHDL increased wound capillary density by 52.6 %. In the HLI model, rHDL infusions augmented blood flow recovery in ischemic limbs (Day 18 by 50 % and Day 21 by 88 %, p < 0.05) and prevented tissue necrosis and toe loss. Assessment of capillary density in ischemic hindlimb sections found a 90 % increase in rHDL infused animals. In vitro studies in fibroblasts isolated from aged mice found that incubation with rHDL was able to significantly increase the key pro-angiogenic mediator vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) protein (25 %, p < 0.05). rHDL can promote wound healing and wound angiogenesis, and blood flow recovery in response to ischemia in aged mice. Mechanistically, this is likely to be via an increase in VEGF. This highlights a potential role for HDL in the therapeutic modulation of age-impaired vascular complications.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 23 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 23 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 5 22%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 13%
Student > Bachelor 3 13%
Student > Master 2 9%
Other 2 9%
Unknown 5 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 9 39%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 17%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 9%
Sports and Recreations 1 4%
Computer Science 1 4%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 6 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 15. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 November 2016.
All research outputs
#624,417
of 8,653,093 outputs
Outputs from Lipids in Health and Disease
#48
of 714 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#28,839
of 254,698 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Lipids in Health and Disease
#3
of 30 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,653,093 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 714 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 254,698 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 30 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.