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Participation in and adherence to physical exercise after completion of primary cancer treatment

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, September 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
58 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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43 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
236 Mendeley
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Title
Participation in and adherence to physical exercise after completion of primary cancer treatment
Published in
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, September 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12966-016-0425-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Caroline S. Kampshoff, Willem van Mechelen, Goof Schep, Marten R. Nijziel, Lenja Witlox, Lisa Bosman, Mai J. M. Chinapaw, Johannes Brug, Laurien M. Buffart

Abstract

The purpose of this study was  to identify demographic, clinical, psychosocial, physical and environmental factors that are associated with participation in and adherence to a combined resistance and endurance exercise program among cancer survivors, shortly after completion of primary cancer treatment. Data from the randomized controlled Resistance and Endurance exercise After ChemoTherapy (REACT) study were used for this study. The participants of the REACT study were randomly allocated to either a high intensity (HI) or low-to-moderate intensity (LMI) exercise program. Patients' participation rate was defined as the cancer survivors' decision to participate in the REACT study. Exercise adherence reflected participants' attendance to the scheduled exercise sessions and their compliance to the prescribed exercises. High session attendance rates were defined as attending at least 80 % of the sessions. High compliance rates were defined as performing at least of 90 % of the prescribed exercise across all sessions. Correlates of exercise adherence were studied separately for HI and LMI exercise. Demographic, clinical, and physical factors were assessed using self-reported questionnaires. Relevant clinical information was extracted from medical records. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were applied to identify correlates that were significantly associated with participation, high session attendance, high compliance with resistance and high compliance with endurance exercises. Participants were more likely to have higher education, be non-smokers, have lower psychological distress, higher outcome expectations, and perceive more exercise barriers than non-participants. In HI exercise, higher self-efficacy was significantly associated with high session attendance and high compliance with endurance exercises, and lower psychological distress was significantly associated with high compliance with resistance exercises. In LMI exercise, being a non-smoker was significantly associated with high compliance with resistance exercises and higher BMI was significantly associated with high compliance with resistance and endurance exercises. Furthermore, breast cancer survivors were less likely to report high compliance with resistance and endurance exercises in LMI exercise compared to survivors of other types of cancer. The discriminative ability of the multivariable models ranged from 0.62 to 0.75. Several demographic, clinical and psychosocial factors were associated with participation in and adherence to exercise among cancer survivors. Psychosocial factors were more strongly associated with adherence in HI than LMI exercise. This study was registered at the Netherlands Trial Register [ NTR2153 ] on the 5(th) of January 2010.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 58 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 236 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Netherlands 1 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 233 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 42 18%
Student > Bachelor 35 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 31 13%
Researcher 18 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 15 6%
Other 36 15%
Unknown 59 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 48 20%
Nursing and Health Professions 38 16%
Sports and Recreations 34 14%
Psychology 24 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 2%
Other 15 6%
Unknown 73 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 34. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 April 2019.
All research outputs
#746,625
of 17,873,421 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#302
of 1,681 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#17,271
of 273,013 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#1
of 5 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,873,421 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,681 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 25.7. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 273,013 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them