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The physiological basis of neurorehabilitation - locomotor training after spinal cord injury

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation, January 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
10 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
102 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
376 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
The physiological basis of neurorehabilitation - locomotor training after spinal cord injury
Published in
Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation, January 2013
DOI 10.1186/1743-0003-10-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Michèle Hubli, Volker Dietz

Abstract

Advances in our understanding of the physiological basis of locomotion enable us to optimize the neurorehabilitation of patients with lesions to the central nervous system, such as stroke or spinal cord injury (SCI). It is generally accepted, based on work in animal models, that spinal neuronal machinery can produce a stepping-like output. In both incomplete and complete SCI subjects spinal locomotor circuitries can be activated by functional training which provides appropriate afferent feedback. In motor complete SCI subjects, however, motor functions caudal to the spinal cord lesion are no longer used resulting in neuronal dysfunction. In contrast, in subjects with an incomplete SCI such training paradigms can lead to improved locomotor ability. Appropriate functional training involves the facilitation and assistance of stepping-like movements with the subjects' legs and body weight support as far as is required. In severely affected subjects standardized assisted locomotor training is provided by body weight supported treadmill training with leg movements either manually assisted or moved by a driven gait orthosis. Load- and hip-joint related afferent input is of crucial importance during locomotor training as it leads to appropriate leg muscle activation and thus increases the efficacy of the rehabilitative training. Successful recovery of locomotion after SCI relies on the ability of spinal locomotor circuitries to utilize specific multisensory information to generate a locomotor pattern. It seems that a critical combination of sensory cues is required to generate and improve locomotor patterns after SCI. In addition to functional locomotor training there are numbers of other promising experimental approaches, such as tonic epidural electrical or magnetic stimulation of the spinal cord, which both promote locomotor permissive states that lead to a coordinated locomotor output. Therefore, a combination of functional training and activation of spinal locomotor circuitries, for example by epidural/flexor reflex electrical stimulation or drug application (e.g. noradrenergic agonists), might constitute an effective strategy to promote neuroplasticity after SCI in the future.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 376 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 3 <1%
Switzerland 2 <1%
Brazil 2 <1%
Colombia 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Czechia 1 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Other 4 1%
Unknown 359 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 67 18%
Researcher 50 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 49 13%
Student > Bachelor 49 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 29 8%
Other 89 24%
Unknown 43 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 108 29%
Neuroscience 57 15%
Engineering 44 12%
Nursing and Health Professions 37 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 34 9%
Other 42 11%
Unknown 54 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 17. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 January 2016.
All research outputs
#1,673,753
of 21,342,999 outputs
Outputs from Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation
#68
of 1,228 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#19,478
of 277,691 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation
#4
of 32 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,342,999 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,228 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 277,691 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 32 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.