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Prediction of response to therapy with ezatiostat in lower risk myelodysplastic syndrome

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Hematology & Oncology, May 2012
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (73rd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (74th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter
patent
1 patent

Citations

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15 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
20 Mendeley
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Title
Prediction of response to therapy with ezatiostat in lower risk myelodysplastic syndrome
Published in
Journal of Hematology & Oncology, May 2012
DOI 10.1186/1756-8722-5-20
Pubmed ID
Authors

Naomi Galili, Pablo Tamayo, Olga B Botvinnik, Jill P Mesirov, Margarita R Brooks, Gail Brown, Azra Raza

Abstract

Approximately 70% of all patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) present with lower-risk disease. Some of these patients will initially respond to treatment with growth factors to improve anemia but will eventually cease to respond, while others will be resistant to growth factor therapy. Eventually, all lower-risk MDS patients require multiple transfusions and long-term therapy. While some patients may respond briefly to hypomethylating agents or lenalidomide, the majority will not, and new therapeutic options are needed for these lower-risk patients. Our previous clinical trials with ezatiostat (ezatiostat hydrochloride, Telentra®, TLK199), a glutathione S-transferase P1-1 inhibitor in clinical development for the treatment of low- to intermediate-risk MDS, have shown significant clinical activity, including multilineage responses as well as durable red-blood-cell transfusion independence. It would be of significant clinical benefit to be able to identify patients most likely to respond to ezatiostat before therapy is initiated. We have previously shown that by using gene expression profiling and grouping by response, it is possible to construct a predictive score that indicates the likelihood that patients without deletion 5q will respond to lenalidomide. The success of that study was based in part on the fact that the profile for response was linked to the biology of the disease.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 20 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Netherlands 1 5%
Unknown 19 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 30%
Researcher 4 20%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 10%
Student > Bachelor 2 10%
Other 2 10%
Unknown 1 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 55%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 15%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 15%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 5%
Unknown 2 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 February 2013.
All research outputs
#4,863,737
of 17,351,915 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Hematology & Oncology
#234
of 859 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#65,659
of 254,915 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Hematology & Oncology
#10
of 35 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,351,915 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 70th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 859 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 254,915 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 35 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.