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Assets and challenges facing caregivers when managing malaria in young children in rural Uganda

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, September 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (62nd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (56th percentile)

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters

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66 Mendeley
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Title
Assets and challenges facing caregivers when managing malaria in young children in rural Uganda
Published in
Malaria Journal, September 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12936-016-1521-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rosemin Kassam, John Collins, Richard Sekiwunga

Abstract

Despite efforts to improve malaria management for children, a substantial gap remains between policy and practice in Uganda. The aim of this study was to create quantitative profiles of assets and challenges facing caregivers in Butaleja District when managing malaria in children aged 5 years and under. The objectives were: (1) to estimate caregivers' assets and challenges during an acute episode; and, (2) to ascertain which caregiver attributes influenced receipt of an appropriate anti-malarial the most. Data from a 2011 cross-sectional, household survey and ten psychometrically justified scales were used to estimate caregivers' assets and challenges. The scales scores were simple counts across a series of items, for example, the number of times a caregiver answered a knowledge item correctly or the number of times a caregiver relied on a credible source for information. Since high scores on six of the scales reflected attributes that eased the burden of caregiving, these were labelled 'caregiver assets'. Similarly, high scores on four of the measures signalled that a caregiver was having trouble managing the malaria episode, thereby reflecting deficits, and these were labelled 'caregiver challenges'. ANOVAs were used to compare scale scores between caregivers of children who received an appropriate anti-malarial versus those who did not. On the six asset scales, caregivers averaged highest on knowledge (65 %), followed by correct episode management (48 %), use of trustworthy information sources (40 %), ability to initiate or redirect their child's treatment (37 %), and lowest on possible encounters with health professionals to assist in treatment decisions (33 %). Similarly, the average caregiver reported problems with 74 % of the issues they might encounter in accessing advice, and 56 % of the problems in obtaining the best anti-malarial. Caregivers whose children received an appropriate anti-malarial demonstrated greater assets and fewer challenges than those whose child did not, with important regional differences existing. Overall, no one region performed particularly well across all ten scales. Findings from this study suggest that the low use of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) in Butaleja for children 5 years and under may result from caregivers' high perceived barrier to accessing ACT and low perceived benefits from ACT.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 66 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 66 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 21 32%
Student > Bachelor 8 12%
Researcher 6 9%
Lecturer 4 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 5%
Other 11 17%
Unknown 13 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 15 23%
Nursing and Health Professions 13 20%
Psychology 5 8%
Social Sciences 4 6%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 3 5%
Other 9 14%
Unknown 17 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 September 2016.
All research outputs
#3,411,547
of 8,409,255 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#1,381
of 2,957 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#93,451
of 252,505 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#47
of 111 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,409,255 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 59th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,957 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 252,505 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 111 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its contemporaries.