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Activation of lignocellulosic biomass for higher sugar yields using aqueous ionic liquid at low severity process conditions

Overview of attention for article published in Biotechnology for Biofuels, August 2016
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Title
Activation of lignocellulosic biomass for higher sugar yields using aqueous ionic liquid at low severity process conditions
Published in
Biotechnology for Biofuels, August 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13068-016-0561-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ramakrishnan Parthasarathi, Jian Sun, Tanmoy Dutta, Ning Sun, Sivakumar Pattathil, N. V. S. N. Murthy Konda, Angelo Gabriel Peralta, Blake A. Simmons, Seema Singh

Abstract

Concerns around greenhouse gas emissions necessitate the development of sustainable processes for the production of chemicals, materials, and fuels from alternative renewable sources. The lignocellulosic plant cell walls are one of the most abundant sources of carbon for renewable bioenergy production. Certain ionic liquids (ILs) are very effective at disrupting the plant cell walls of lignocellulose, and generate a substrate that is effectively hydrolyzed into fermentable sugars. Conventional ILs are relatively expensive in terms of purchase price, and the most effective imidazolium-based ILs also require energy intensive processing conditions (>140 °C, 3 h) to release >90 % fermentable sugar yields after saccharification. We have developed a highly effective pretreatment technology utilizing the relatively inexpensive IL comprised tetrabutylammonium [TBA](+) and hydroxide [OH](-) ions that generate high glucose yields (~95 %) after pretreatment at very mild processing conditions (50 °C). The efficiency of [TBA][OH] pretreatment of lignocellulose was further studied by analyzing chemical composition, powder X-ray diffraction for cellulose structure, NMR and SEC for lignin dissolution/depolymerization, and glycome profiling for cell wall modifications. Glycome profiling experiments and computational results indicate that removal of the noncellulosic polysaccharides occurs due to the ionic mobility of [TBA][OH] and is the key factor in determining pretreatment efficiency. Process modeling and energy demand analysis suggests that this [TBA][OH] pretreatment could potentially reduce the energy required in the pretreatment unit operation by more than 75 %. By leveraging the benefits of ILs that are effective at very mild processing conditions, such as [TBA][OH], lignocellulosic biomass can be pretreated at similar efficiency as top performing conventional ILs, such as 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate [C2C1Im][OAc], but at much lower temperatures, and with less than half the IL normally required to be effective. [TBA][OH] IL is more reactive in terms of ionic mobility which extends removal of lignin and noncellulosic components of biomass at the lower temperature pretreatment. This approach to biomass pretreatment at lower temperatures could be transformative in the affordability and energy efficiency of lignocellulosic biorefineries.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 66 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Thailand 1 2%
Brazil 1 2%
Unknown 64 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 12 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 11%
Student > Bachelor 6 9%
Professor > Associate Professor 5 8%
Other 14 21%
Unknown 14 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Engineering 11 17%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 14%
Chemical Engineering 6 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 6%
Chemistry 4 6%
Other 17 26%
Unknown 15 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 September 2016.
All research outputs
#6,101,287
of 8,440,126 outputs
Outputs from Biotechnology for Biofuels
#474
of 688 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#163,316
of 252,797 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Biotechnology for Biofuels
#17
of 21 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,440,126 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 688 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.0. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 252,797 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 21 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.