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Charting health system reconstruction in post-war Liberia: a comparison of rural vs. remote healthcare utilization

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, September 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (66th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (52nd percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

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14 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
205 Mendeley
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Title
Charting health system reconstruction in post-war Liberia: a comparison of rural vs. remote healthcare utilization
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, September 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12913-016-1709-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Katherine Kentoffio, John D. Kraemer, Thomas Griffiths, Avi Kenny, Rajesh Panjabi, G. Andrew Sechler, Stephen Selinsky, Mark J. Siedner

Abstract

Despite a growing global emphasis on universal healthcare, access to basic primary care for remote populations in post-conflict countries remains a challenge. To better understand health sector recovery in post-conflict Liberia, this paper seeks to evaluate changes in utilization of health services among rural populations across a 5-year time span. We assessed trends in healthcare utilization among the national rural population using the Liberian Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) from 2007 and 2013. We compared these results to results obtained from a two-staged cluster survey in 2012 in the district of Konobo, Liberia, to assess for differential health utilization in an isolated, remote region. Our primary outcomes of interest were maternal and child health service care seeking and utilization. Most child and maternal health indicators improved in the DHS rural sub-sample from 2007 to 2013. However, this progress was not reflected in the remote Konobo population. A lower proportion of women received 4+ antenatal care visits (AOR 0.28, P < 0.001) or any postnatal care (AOR 0.25, P <0.001) in Konobo as compared to the 2013 DHS. Similarly, a lower proportion of children received professional care for common childhood illnesses, including acute respiratory infection (9 % vs. 52 %, P < 0.001) or diarrhea (11 % vs. 46 %, P < 0.001). Our data suggest that, despite the demonstrable success of post-war rehabilitation in rural regions, particularly remote populations in Liberia remain at disproportionate risk for limited access to basic health services. As a renewed effort is placed on health systems reconstruction in the wake of the Ebola-epidemic, a specific focus on solutions to reach isolated populations will be necessary in order to ensure extension of coverage to remote regions such as Konobo.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 205 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 205 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 51 25%
Researcher 33 16%
Student > Bachelor 15 7%
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 12 6%
Other 36 18%
Unknown 45 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 49 24%
Nursing and Health Professions 38 19%
Social Sciences 22 11%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 7 3%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 2%
Other 27 13%
Unknown 57 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 January 2018.
All research outputs
#6,981,149
of 22,888,307 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#3,420
of 7,655 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#108,696
of 334,966 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#108
of 231 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,888,307 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 68th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,655 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 334,966 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 231 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.