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Onset of persistent pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in children with cystic fibrosis with interval censored data

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medical Research Methodology, September 2016
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3 tweeters

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19 Mendeley
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Title
Onset of persistent pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in children with cystic fibrosis with interval censored data
Published in
BMC Medical Research Methodology, September 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12874-016-0220-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Wenjie Wang, Ming-Hui Chen, Sy Han Chiou, Hui-Chuan Lai, Xiaojing Wang, Jun Yan, Zhumin Zhang

Abstract

Persistent Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PPA) infection promotes lung function deterioration in children with cystic fibrosis (CF). Although early CF diagnosis through newborn screening (NBS) has been shown to provide nutritional/growth benefit, it is unclear whether NBS lowers the risk of PPA infection and how the effect of NBS vary with age. Modeling the onset age of PPA infection is challenging because 1) the onset age of PPA infection is interval censored in patient registry data; and 2) some risk factors such as NBS may have time-varying effects. This problem fits into the framework of a recently developed Bayesian dynamic Cox model for interval censored data, where each regression coefficient is allowed to be time-varying to an extent determined by the data. Application of the methodology to data from the CF Foundation Patient Registry revealed interesting findings. Compared with patients with meconium ileus or diagnosed through signs or symptoms, patients diagnosed through NBS had significantly lower risks of acquiring PPA infection between age 1 and 2 years, and the benefit in survival rate was found to last up to age 4 years. Two cohorts of five years apart were compared. Patients born in cohort 2003-2004 had significantly lower risks of the PPA infections at any age up to 4 years than those born in 1998-1999. The study supports benefits of NBS on PPA infection in early childhood. In addition, our analyses demonstrate that patients in the more recent cohort had significantly lower risks of acquiring PPA infection up to age 4 years, which suggests improved CF treatment and care over time.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 19 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 19 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 5 26%
Researcher 4 21%
Librarian 2 11%
Student > Master 2 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 5%
Other 2 11%
Unknown 3 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 6 32%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 26%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 5%
Arts and Humanities 1 5%
Social Sciences 1 5%
Other 1 5%
Unknown 4 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 September 2016.
All research outputs
#9,132,264
of 15,645,310 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medical Research Methodology
#975
of 1,469 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#131,916
of 269,337 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medical Research Methodology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,645,310 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,469 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.6. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 269,337 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them