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Pre-contact by telephone increases response rates to postal questionnaires in a population of stroke patients: an open ended randomized controlled trial

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, September 2016
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2 tweeters

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6 Dimensions

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14 Mendeley
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Title
Pre-contact by telephone increases response rates to postal questionnaires in a population of stroke patients: an open ended randomized controlled trial
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, September 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12913-016-1732-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mathias Barra, Tone Breines Simonsen, Fredrik Andreas Dahl

Abstract

A follow-up study on a cohort of stroke patients through a postal survey questionnaire 3 and 12 months after discharge from hospital was performed. The response rate at 3-months follow-up was lower than desired, and pre-contact by phone as a measure for increasing the response rate at 12 months was studied. The study design was a randomized controlled trial on a cohort of 3 months follow-up-non-responders where the intervention group was pre-contacted with an aim to obtain an informal 'consent to receive' the questionnaire before the 12-months survey was mailed, and the control group was not. The primary outcome was 45 days response rate; secondary outcome was 365 days response rate. The main analysis followed the intention to treat principle. A secondary, per-protocol analysis (i.e. subjects who were not reached by phone were reassigned to the control group) is included. Also included is a rudimentary cost-utility analysis, where we estimated the cost per additional response. Of the 235 subjects, 116 were randomized to the intervention group and 119 to the control group. 10 were excluded due to death (7 in the IG and 3 in the CG), 6 due to dementia (3 in the IG and 3 in the CG), and 2 (1 in the IG and 1 in the CG) for other reasons. The primary outcome was a response rate of 42.9 % in the intervention group, and 26.8 % in the control group, giving p =0.014, with estimated OR of 2.04 (95 % CI [1.16,3.64]). The secondary outcome had p =0.009 with OR 2.10 (95 % CI [1.20,3.70]). The as-per-protocol analyses gave stronger results with p =0.001 and p =0.003, respectively. The cost-utility analysis gave a time cost of 1 working hour per additional response. The results are in line with previous research, and show that pre-contact has a positive effect on response rate also for a population of elderly with reduced health. Given the importance of high response rate in surveys, a cost of 1 working hour per additional response is likely to be worth while. Registration with ISRCTN initiated on 05/21/2013 and finalised on 06/30/2014 with http://www.isrctn.com/ISRCTN31304930 . Following the prospective submission in May 2013, there were no subsequent changes to the protocol. The recruitment started on 01/06/13, after initiation of public registration.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 14 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 14 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 4 29%
Librarian 2 14%
Student > Bachelor 2 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 7%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 7%
Other 3 21%
Unknown 1 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 3 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 21%
Mathematics 2 14%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 7%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 7%
Other 3 21%
Unknown 1 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 September 2016.
All research outputs
#4,250,305
of 8,418,826 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#2,007
of 3,136 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#129,402
of 253,794 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#118
of 178 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,418,826 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,136 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.5. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 253,794 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 178 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.