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The social, psychological, emotional morbidity and adjustment techniques for women with anal incontinence following Obstetric Anal Sphincter Injury: use of a word picture to identify a hidden syndrome

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, September 2016
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2 tweeters

Citations

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20 Dimensions

Readers on

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76 Mendeley
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Title
The social, psychological, emotional morbidity and adjustment techniques for women with anal incontinence following Obstetric Anal Sphincter Injury: use of a word picture to identify a hidden syndrome
Published in
BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, September 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12884-016-1065-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

M. R. B. Keighley, Yvette Perston, Elissa Bradshaw, Joanne Hayes, D. Margaret Keighley, Sara Webb

Abstract

To identify the emotional, social and psychological consequences and recovery process of anal incontinence (AI) following obstetric anal sphincter injuries (OASIS) and explore if this can be identified as a recognisable syndrome with visual representation. A qualitative approach was adopted for this study. Data derived from case studies (n = 81) and interviews (n = 14) with women with AI after OASIS was used to identify the emotional, social and psychological consequences of AI after OASIS. Keywords and synonyms were extracted and the power of these statements displayed as a 'word picture'. The validity and authenticity of the word picture was then assessed by: a questionnaire sent to a group of mothers who had experienced this condition (n = 16); a focus group attended by mothers (n = 14) and supported by health professionals (n = 6) and via interviews with health professionals (n = 12) who were involved with helping mothers with AI following OASIS. Women with AI resulting from OASIS have a specific syndrome - the 'OASIS Syndrome' - which we have uniquely visualised as a 'word picture'. They feel unclean which results in dignity loss, psychosexual morbidity, isolation, embarrassment, guilt, fear, grief, feeling low, anxiety, loss of confidence, a feeling of having been mutilated and a compromised role as a mother. Coping relies on repetitive washing (which may become a ritual), planning daily activities around toiletry needs, sharing, family support, employment if possible and attention to the baby. Recovery and healing is through care of the child and hope generated by love within the family. This study has identified a previously unrecognised 'OASIS Syndrome' and, by way of a new and unique 'word picture', revealed a hidden condition. There should be greater awareness by the public and profession about the 'OASIS Syndrome' and a mechanism for early identification of the condition and referral for management. This, if successful, would overcome the barrier of silence which surrounds this currently unspoken taboo.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 76 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 1%
Unknown 75 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 11 14%
Student > Master 10 13%
Other 7 9%
Researcher 4 5%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 5%
Other 12 16%
Unknown 28 37%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 16 21%
Nursing and Health Professions 15 20%
Psychology 9 12%
Social Sciences 3 4%
Computer Science 1 1%
Other 3 4%
Unknown 29 38%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 September 2016.
All research outputs
#4,013,855
of 8,446,126 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#1,118
of 1,716 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#119,732
of 254,099 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#54
of 83 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,446,126 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 50th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,716 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.5. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 254,099 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 83 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.