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Acquisition and loss of virulence-associated factors during genome evolution and speciation in three clades of Bordetella species

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Genomics, September 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (82nd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
6 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
50 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
55 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
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Title
Acquisition and loss of virulence-associated factors during genome evolution and speciation in three clades of Bordetella species
Published in
BMC Genomics, September 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12864-016-3112-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Bodo Linz, Yury V. Ivanov, Andrew Preston, Lauren Brinkac, Julian Parkhill, Maria Kim, Simon R. Harris, Laura L. Goodfield, Norman K. Fry, Andrew R. Gorringe, Tracy L. Nicholson, Karen B. Register, Liliana Losada, Eric T. Harvill

Abstract

The genus Bordetella consists of nine species that include important respiratory pathogens such as the 'classical' species B. bronchiseptica, B. pertussis and B. parapertussis and six more distantly related and less extensively studied species. Here we analyze sequence diversity and gene content of 128 genome sequences from all nine species with focus on the evolution of virulence-associated factors. Both genome-wide sequence-based and gene content-based phylogenetic trees divide the genus into three species clades. The phylogenies are congruent between species suggesting genus-wide co-evolution of sequence diversity and gene content, but less correlated within species, mainly because of strain-specific presence of many different prophages. We compared the genomes with focus on virulence-associated genes and identified multiple clade-specific, species-specific and strain-specific events of gene acquisition and gene loss, including genes encoding O-antigens, protein secretion systems and bacterial toxins. Gene loss was more frequent than gene gain throughout the evolution, and loss of hundreds of genes was associated with the origin of several species, including the recently evolved human-restricted B. pertussis and B. holmesii, B. parapertussis and the avian pathogen B. avium. Acquisition and loss of multiple genes drive the evolution and speciation in the genus Bordetella, including large scale gene loss associated with the origin of several species. Recent loss and functional inactivation of genes, including those encoding pertussis vaccine components and bacterial toxins, in individual strains emphasize ongoing evolution.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 55 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
France 1 2%
Unknown 53 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 12 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 18%
Student > Bachelor 8 15%
Unspecified 5 9%
Professor 4 7%
Other 7 13%
Unknown 9 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 13 24%
Immunology and Microbiology 10 18%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 10 18%
Unspecified 5 9%
Chemical Engineering 2 4%
Other 4 7%
Unknown 11 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 February 2022.
All research outputs
#2,662,354
of 21,108,726 outputs
Outputs from BMC Genomics
#1,030
of 10,218 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#48,493
of 290,419 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Genomics
#1
of 18 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,108,726 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 86th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 10,218 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 290,419 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 18 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.