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Perinatal mortality associated with use of uterotonics outside of Comprehensive Emergency Obstetric and Neonatal Care: a cross-sectional study

Overview of attention for article published in Reproductive Health, October 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (60th percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

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49 Mendeley
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Title
Perinatal mortality associated with use of uterotonics outside of Comprehensive Emergency Obstetric and Neonatal Care: a cross-sectional study
Published in
Reproductive Health, October 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12978-016-0241-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Louise T. Day, Louise T. Day, Daniel Hruschka, Felicity Mussell, Eva Jeffers, Stacy L. Saha, Shafiul Alam

Abstract

Prior studies have shown that using uterotonics to augment or induce labor before arrival at comprehensive Emergency Obstetric and Neonatal Care (CEmONC) settings (henceforth, "outside uterotonics") may contribute to perinatal mortality in low- and middle-income countries. We estimate its effect on perinatal mortality in rural Bangladesh. Using hospital records (23986 singleton term births, Jan 1, 2009-Dec 31, 2015) from rural Bangladesh, we use a logistic regression model to estimate the increased risk of perinatal death from uterotonics administered outside a CEmONC facility. Among term births (≥37 weeks gestation), the risk of perinatal death adjusted for key confounders is significantly increased among women reporting uterotonic use outside of CEmONC (OR = 3 · 0, 95 % CI = 2 · 4,3 · 7). This increased risk is particularly high for fresh stillbirths (OR = 4 · 0, 95 % CI = 3 · 0,5 · 3) and intrapartum-related causes of early neonatal deaths (birth asphyxia) (OR = 3 · 1, 95 % CI = 2 · 2,4 · 5). In this sample, outside uterotonic use was associated with substantially increased risk of fresh stillbirths, deaths due to birth asphyxia, and all perinatal deaths. In settings of high uterotonic use outside of controlled settings, substantial improvement in both stillbirth and early neonatal mortality may be made by reducing such use.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 49 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 49 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 9 18%
Student > Master 6 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 10%
Other 4 8%
Student > Postgraduate 3 6%
Other 7 14%
Unknown 15 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 19 39%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 10%
Social Sciences 4 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 2%
Other 3 6%
Unknown 15 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 October 2016.
All research outputs
#3,551,821
of 8,508,684 outputs
Outputs from Reproductive Health
#304
of 534 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#98,966
of 253,820 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Reproductive Health
#23
of 29 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,508,684 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 57th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 534 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.9. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 253,820 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 29 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.