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Possibly preventable cardiac arrest in a morbidly obese patient - a comment on the 2015 ERC guidelines

Overview of attention for article published in Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, October 2016
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Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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1 Dimensions

Readers on

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9 Mendeley
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Title
Possibly preventable cardiac arrest in a morbidly obese patient - a comment on the 2015 ERC guidelines
Published in
Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, October 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13049-016-0306-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Felix Patricius Hans, Claudia Johanna Maria Hoeren, Phillipp Kellmeyer, Lisa Hohloch, Hans-Jörg Busch, Jörg Bayer

Abstract

The incidence of overweight and obesity has been steadily on the rise and has reached epidemic proportions in various countries and this represents a well-known major health problem. Nevertheless, current guidelines for resuscitation do not include special sequences of action in this subset of patients. The aim of this letter is to bring this controversy into focus and to suggest alterations of the known standard cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the obese. An obese patient weighing 272 kg fell to the floor, afterwards being unable to get up again. Thus, emergency services were called for assistance. There were no signs or symptoms signifying that the person had been harmed in consequence of the fall. Only when brought into a supine position the patient suffered an immediate cardiac arrest. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation was performed but there was no return of a stable spontaneous circulation until the patient was brought into a full lateral position. In spite of immediate emergency care the patient ultimately suffered a lethal hypoxic brain damage. A full lateral position should be considered in obese patients having a cardiac arrest as it might help to re-establish stable circulatory conditions.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 9 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 9 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 22%
Student > Bachelor 2 22%
Student > Master 2 22%
Librarian 1 11%
Student > Postgraduate 1 11%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 1 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 6 67%
Psychology 1 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 11%
Unknown 1 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 October 2016.
All research outputs
#3,702,793
of 7,588,328 outputs
Outputs from Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine
#369
of 567 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#122,856
of 242,504 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine
#21
of 26 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,588,328 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 567 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.7. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 242,504 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 26 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.