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The associations between sedentary behaviour and mental health among adolescents: a systematic review

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, October 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
policy
2 policy sources
twitter
84 tweeters
facebook
8 Facebook pages
googleplus
2 Google+ users

Citations

dimensions_citation
274 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
907 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
The associations between sedentary behaviour and mental health among adolescents: a systematic review
Published in
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, October 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12966-016-0432-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Erin Hoare, Karen Milton, Charlie Foster, Steven Allender

Abstract

With technological developments and modernised sedentary lifestyles has come an increase in diseases associated with inactivity such as obesity and other non-communicable diseases. Emerging evidence suggests that time spent sedentary may also interact with mental health. This systematic review examined the associations between sedentary behaviour and mental health problems among adolescents. This systematic review followed Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses, and applied a quality assessment tool for quantitative studies to identity best available evidence. Following stringent search strategy of the databases; Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Global Health, Health Source: Nursing and Academic Edition, MEDLINE, PsychARTICLES and PsycINFO, we identified 32 articles eligible for review. All studies reported leisure screen time among adolescents, and two thirds of identified studies examined depressive symptomatology. Other mental health measures were; anxiety symptoms, self-esteem, suicide ideation, loneliness, stress, and psychological distress. Strong consistent evidence was found for the relationship between both depressive symptomatology and psychological distress, and time spent using screens for leisure. Moderate evidence supported the relationship between low self-esteem and screen use. Poorer mental health status was found among adolescents using screen time more than 2-3 h per day, and gender differences exist. Essential information was missing for quality of evidence including heterogeneity in mental health and screen time-based measures, and self-report data collection methods. The findings are of particular significance given the global public health concern of lifestyle-attributed diseases and the possibility for novel approaches to mental health. Future research should examine the psychological impact of reducing time spent using screens for leisure among adolescents, whilst accounting for possible confounding factors such as physical activity and dietary behaviours. It is critical that the reciprocal relationship between lifestyle behaviours and mental health is represented in both the psychiatric and public health forum.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 84 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 907 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Czechia 1 <1%
Unknown 905 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 145 16%
Student > Bachelor 134 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 91 10%
Researcher 58 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 52 6%
Other 142 16%
Unknown 285 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 111 12%
Medicine and Dentistry 108 12%
Psychology 106 12%
Sports and Recreations 72 8%
Social Sciences 62 7%
Other 110 12%
Unknown 338 37%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 88. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 March 2021.
All research outputs
#380,121
of 21,799,263 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#113
of 1,868 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#8,705
of 294,022 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#1
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,799,263 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,868 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 27.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 294,022 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them