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Development of a reliable questionnaire to assist in the diagnosis of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD)

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pediatrics, March 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (57th percentile)

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters

Citations

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17 Dimensions

Readers on

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59 Mendeley
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Title
Development of a reliable questionnaire to assist in the diagnosis of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD)
Published in
BMC Pediatrics, March 2013
DOI 10.1186/1471-2431-13-33
Pubmed ID
Authors

James P Fitzpatrick, Jane Latimer, Manuela Ferreira, Alexandra LC Martiniuk, Elizabeth Peadon, Maureen Carter, June Oscar, Emily Carter, Meredith Kefford, Rhonda Shandley, Harry Yungabun, Elizabeth J Elliott

Abstract

BACKGROUND: A battery of clinical assessments was used in the Lililwan* Project, Australia's first population-based Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD) prevalence study, conducted in the remote Fitzroy Valley, Western Australia. One objective was to develop and assess test-retest reliability of an acceptable questionnaire for collecting health information in remote Aboriginal communities feasible for use in the Lililwan Project. METHODS: A questionnaire was developed by paediatricians to assist in diagnosis of FASD. Content was based on a literature review of FASD diagnostic criteria, existing questionnaires and risk factors for FASD and birth defects. Aboriginal community members, including qualified Aboriginal language interpreters, adapted the questionnaire to ensure language and cultural components were appropriate for use in the Fitzroy Valley. Locally developed pictorial aids were used for gathering accurate information on alcohol use. Aboriginal 'community navigators' assisted researchers to translate the questions into Kimberley Kriol or local Aboriginal languages depending on participant preference.A subset of 14 questions was assessed for test-retest reliability in 30 parents/carers of children in the Lililwan Project cohort, who were interviewed by one rater using the entire questionnaire, then by a second rater who repeated 14 critical questions at least 6 hours later. RESULTS: The full questionnaire contained 112 items and took 50 minutes to administer. For a subset of 14 items from the full questionnaire percent exact agreement between raters ranged from 55-90%, and was below 70% for only 2 questions. Test-retest reliability was excellent (Kappa 0.81-1.00) for 5 items, substantial (Kappa 0.61-0.80) for 5 items, and moderate, fair or slight (Kappa <=0.60) for the remaining 4 items tested. Test-retest reliability for questions relating to alcohol use in pregnancy was excellent. When questions had moderate, fair or slight agreement, information was obtained from alternate sources e.g. medical records. Qualitative feedback from parents/carers confirmed acceptability of the questionnaire. CONCLUSIONS: This questionnaire had acceptable test-retest reliability and could be used to collect demographic, socio-cultural and biomedical information relevant to the diagnosis of FASD in Aboriginal communities throughout Australia and elsewhere. Community input is crucial when developing and administering questionnaires for use in cross-cultural contexts.*Lililwan is a Kimberley Kriol word meaning 'all the little ones'. Kimberley Kriol is the main language spoken by Aboriginal people in the Fitzroy Valley.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 59 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 2%
South Africa 1 2%
Australia 1 2%
Unknown 56 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 14 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 17%
Researcher 8 14%
Student > Bachelor 7 12%
Student > Postgraduate 4 7%
Other 11 19%
Unknown 5 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 21 36%
Psychology 11 19%
Social Sciences 9 15%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 3%
Other 6 10%
Unknown 6 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 March 2013.
All research outputs
#6,647,485
of 12,373,815 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pediatrics
#762
of 1,456 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#60,016
of 142,220 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pediatrics
#3
of 4 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,373,815 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,456 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.9. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 142,220 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.