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Ecological conditions determine extinction risk in co-evolving bacteria-phage populations

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, October 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (85th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (73rd percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
11 tweeters

Readers on

mendeley
68 Mendeley
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Title
Ecological conditions determine extinction risk in co-evolving bacteria-phage populations
Published in
BMC Evolutionary Biology, October 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12862-016-0808-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rosanna C. T. Wright, Michael A. Brockhurst, Ellie Harrison

Abstract

Antagonistic coevolution between bacteria and their viral parasites, phage, drives continual evolution of resistance and infectivity traits through recurrent cycles of adaptation and counter-adaptation. Both partners are vulnerable to extinction through failure of adaptation. Environmental conditions may impose unequal abiotic selection pressures on each partner, destabilising the coevolutionary relationship and increasing the extinction risk of one partner. In this study we explore how the degree of population mixing and resource supply affect coevolution-induced extinction risk by coevolving replicate populations of Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25 with its associated lytic phage SBW25Ф2 under four treatment regimens incorporating low and high resource availability with mixed or static growth conditions. We observed an increased risk of phage extinction under population mixing, and in low resource conditions. High levels of evolved bacterial resistance promoted phage extinction at low resources under both mixed and static conditions, whereas phage populations could survive when phage susceptible bacterial genotypes rose to high frequency. These findings demonstrate that phage extinction risk is influenced by multiple abiotic conditions, which together act to destabilise the bacteria-phage coevolutionary relationship. The risk of coevolution-induced extinction is therefore dependent on the ecological context.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 11 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 68 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Belgium 1 1%
Unknown 67 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 23 34%
Student > Master 10 15%
Student > Bachelor 9 13%
Researcher 9 13%
Lecturer 2 3%
Other 6 9%
Unknown 9 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 28 41%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 11 16%
Immunology and Microbiology 5 7%
Environmental Science 4 6%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 1%
Other 7 10%
Unknown 12 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 12. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 October 2016.
All research outputs
#2,607,599
of 22,896,955 outputs
Outputs from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#596
of 2,913 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#46,636
of 313,854 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#21
of 79 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,896,955 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 88th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,913 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 313,854 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 79 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.