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Hypoxia increases genome-wide bivalent epigenetic marking by specific gain of H3K27me3

Overview of attention for article published in Epigenetics & Chromatin, October 2016
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (72nd percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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11 tweeters

Citations

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50 Dimensions

Readers on

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95 Mendeley
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1 CiteULike
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Title
Hypoxia increases genome-wide bivalent epigenetic marking by specific gain of H3K27me3
Published in
Epigenetics & Chromatin, October 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13072-016-0086-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Peggy Prickaerts, Michiel E. Adriaens, Twan van den Beucken, Elizabeth Koch, Ludwig Dubois, Vivian E. H. Dahlmans, Caroline Gits, Chris T. A. Evelo, Michelle Chan-Seng-Yue, Bradly G. Wouters, Jan Willem Voncken

Abstract

Trimethylation at histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4me3) and lysine 27 (H3K27me3) controls gene activity during development and differentiation. Whether H3K4me3 and H3K27me3 changes dynamically in response to altered microenvironmental conditions, including low-oxygen conditions commonly present in solid tumors, is relatively unknown. Demethylation of H3K4me3 and H3K27me3 is mediated by oxygen and 2-oxoglutarate dioxygenases enzymes, suggesting that oxygen deprivation (hypoxia) may influence histone trimethylation. Using the MCF7 breast epithelial adenocarcinoma cell model, we have determined the relationship between epigenomic and transcriptomic reprogramming as a function of fluctuating oxygen tension. We find that in MCF7, H3K4me3 and H3K27me3 marks rapidly increase at specific locations throughout the genome and are largely reversed upon reoxygenation. Whereas dynamic changes are relatively highest for H3K27me3 marking under hypoxic conditions, H3K4me3 occupation is identified as the defining epigenetic marker of transcriptional control. In agreement with the global increase of H3K27 trimethylation, we provide direct evidence that the histone H3K27me3 demethylase KDM6B/JMJD3 is inactivated by limited oxygen. In situ immunohistochemical analysis confirms a marked rise of histone trimethylation in hypoxic tumor areas. Acquisition of H3K27me3 at H3K4me3-marked loci results in a striking increase in "bivalent" epigenetic marking. Hypoxia-induced bivalency substantially overlaps with embryonal stem cell-associated genic bivalency and is retained at numerous loci upon reoxygenation. Transcriptional activity is selectively and progressively dampened at bivalently marked loci upon repeated exposure to hypoxia, indicating that this subset of genes uniquely maintains the potential for epigenetic regulation by KDM activity. These data suggest that dynamic regulation of the epigenetic state within the tumor environment may have important consequences for tumor plasticity and biology.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 11 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 95 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Netherlands 1 1%
Unknown 94 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 20 21%
Researcher 15 16%
Student > Master 11 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 10 11%
Student > Bachelor 8 8%
Other 13 14%
Unknown 18 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 40 42%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 20 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 3%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 2%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 2%
Other 9 9%
Unknown 19 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 March 2019.
All research outputs
#3,754,518
of 15,835,226 outputs
Outputs from Epigenetics & Chromatin
#167
of 455 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#79,677
of 295,841 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Epigenetics & Chromatin
#33
of 58 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,835,226 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 76th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 455 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 295,841 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 58 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.