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Placental contribution to the origins of sexual dimorphism in health and diseases: sex chromosomes and epigenetics

Overview of attention for article published in Biology of Sex Differences, March 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
2 tweeters
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

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212 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
236 Mendeley
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Title
Placental contribution to the origins of sexual dimorphism in health and diseases: sex chromosomes and epigenetics
Published in
Biology of Sex Differences, March 2013
DOI 10.1186/2042-6410-4-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anne Gabory, Tessa J Roseboom, Tom Moore, Lorna G Moore, Claudine Junien

Abstract

Sex differences occur in most non-communicable diseases, including metabolic diseases, hypertension, cardiovascular disease, psychiatric and neurological disorders and cancer. In many cases, the susceptibility to these diseases begins early in development. The observed differences between the sexes may result from genetic and hormonal differences and from differences in responses to and interactions with environmental factors, including infection, diet, drugs and stress. The placenta plays a key role in fetal growth and development and, as such, affects the fetal programming underlying subsequent adult health and accounts, in part for the developmental origin of health and disease (DOHaD). There is accumulating evidence to demonstrate the sex-specific relationships between diverse environmental influences on placental functions and the risk of disease later in life. As one of the few tissues easily collectable in humans, this organ may therefore be seen as an ideal system for studying how male and female placenta sense nutritional and other stresses, such as endocrine disruptors. Sex-specific regulatory pathways controlling sexually dimorphic characteristics in the various organs and the consequences of lifelong differences in sex hormone expression largely account for such responses. However, sex-specific changes in epigenetic marks are generated early after fertilization, thus before adrenal and gonad differentiation in the absence of sex hormones and in response to environmental conditions. Given the abundance of X-linked genes involved in placentogenesis, and the early unequal gene expression by the sex chromosomes between males and females, the role of X- and Y-chromosome-linked genes, and especially those involved in the peculiar placenta-specific epigenetics processes, giving rise to the unusual placenta epigenetic landscapes deserve particular attention. However, even with recent developments in this field, we still know little about the mechanisms underlying the early sex-specific epigenetic marks resulting in sex-biased gene expression of pathways and networks. As a critical messenger between the maternal environment and the fetus, the placenta may play a key role not only in buffering environmental effects transmitted by the mother but also in expressing and modulating effects due to preconceptional exposure of both the mother and the father to stressful conditions.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 236 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 1%
Japan 2 <1%
United Kingdom 2 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Cameroon 1 <1%
Ireland 1 <1%
Malaysia 1 <1%
Unknown 225 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 60 25%
Researcher 43 18%
Student > Bachelor 28 12%
Student > Master 23 10%
Professor 15 6%
Other 39 17%
Unknown 28 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 55 23%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 42 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 38 16%
Neuroscience 17 7%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 10 4%
Other 35 15%
Unknown 39 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 October 2017.
All research outputs
#2,069,194
of 17,351,915 outputs
Outputs from Biology of Sex Differences
#78
of 358 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#19,639
of 160,837 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Biology of Sex Differences
#2
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,351,915 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 87th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 358 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 19.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 160,837 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.