↓ Skip to main content

The CFTR-derived peptides as a model of sequence-specific protein aggregation

Overview of attention for article published in Cellular & Molecular Biology Letters, January 2007
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
3 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
7 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
The CFTR-derived peptides as a model of sequence-specific protein aggregation
Published in
Cellular & Molecular Biology Letters, January 2007
DOI 10.2478/s11658-007-0014-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Daniel Bąk, Garry Cutting, Michał Milewski

Abstract

Protein aggregation is a hallmark of a growing group of pathologies known as conformational diseases. Although many native or mutated proteins are able to form aggregates, the exact amino acid sequences involved in the process of aggregation are known only in a few cases. Hence, there is a need for different model systems to expand our knowledge in this area. The so-called ag region was previously found to cause the aggregation of the C-terminal fragment of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). To investigate whether this specific amino acid sequence is able to induce protein aggregation irrespective of the amino acid context, we altered its position within the CFTR-derived C-terminal peptide and analyzed the localization of such modified peptides in transfected mammalian cells. Insertion of the ag region into a different amino acid background affected not only the overall level of intracellular protein aggregation, but also the morphology and subcellular localization of aggregates, suggesting that sequences other than the ag region can substantially influence the peptide's behavior. Also, the introduction of a short dipeptide (His-Arg) motif, a crucial component of the ag region, into different locations within the C-terminus of CFTR lead to changes in the aggregation pattern that were less striking, although still statistically significant. Thus, our results indicate that even subtle alterations within the aggregating peptide can affect many different aspects of the aggregation process.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 7 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Netherlands 1 14%
Portugal 1 14%
Canada 1 14%
Unknown 4 57%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 43%
Researcher 2 29%
Other 1 14%
Student > Postgraduate 1 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 43%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 14%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 14%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 14%
Chemistry 1 14%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 March 2013.
All research outputs
#11,149,838
of 12,533,815 outputs
Outputs from Cellular & Molecular Biology Letters
#136
of 174 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#121,704
of 145,221 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cellular & Molecular Biology Letters
#2
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,533,815 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 174 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.4. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 145,221 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.