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Risk of uterine, ovarian and breast cancer following pelvic inflammatory disease: a nationwide population-based retrospective cohort study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Cancer, November 2016
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Mentioned by

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1 tweeter
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2 Facebook pages

Citations

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14 Dimensions

Readers on

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24 Mendeley
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Title
Risk of uterine, ovarian and breast cancer following pelvic inflammatory disease: a nationwide population-based retrospective cohort study
Published in
BMC Cancer, November 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12885-016-2857-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Cheng-Che Shen, Li-Yu Hu, Albert C. Yang, Yung-Yen Chiang, Jeng-Hsiu Hung, Shih-Jen Tsai

Abstract

Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is characterized by infection and inflammation of the upper genital tract in women and is associated with health sequelae. We used a nationwide population-based retrospective cohort study to explore the relationship between PID and the subsequent development of gynecological cancers including ovarian, breast or uterine cancer. We identified subjects diagnosed with PID between January 1(st), 2000 and December 31(st), 2002 in the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. A comparison cohort constructed for patients without PID were matched according to age and sex. All PID patients and control groups were observed until diagnosed with ovarian, breast or uterine cancer, or until death, withdrawal from the NHI system, or until December 31(st), 2009. The PID cohort consisted of 32,268 patients, and an equal number of matched controls without PID. The adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of ovarian, breast or uterine cancer in subjects with PID were: HR 1.326 (95 % confidence interval: 0.775-2.269), HR: 1.039 (95 % confidence interval: 0.862-1.252), and HR: 1.439 (95 % confidence interval: 0.853-2.426) respectively in comparison with controls during follow-up. This large nationwide population-based cohort study suggests that there is no increased risk for ovarian, breast or uterine cancer among women who have PID compared to a matching population.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 24 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
South Africa 1 4%
Unknown 23 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 8 33%
Student > Master 4 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 13%
Professor 2 8%
Lecturer 1 4%
Other 3 13%
Unknown 3 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 8 33%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 8%
Psychology 2 8%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 4%
Other 4 17%
Unknown 4 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 November 2016.
All research outputs
#6,241,719
of 8,597,853 outputs
Outputs from BMC Cancer
#1,984
of 3,568 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#159,119
of 246,359 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Cancer
#54
of 116 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,597,853 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,568 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.7. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 246,359 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 116 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.