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Feasibility of alcohol screening among patients receiving opioid treatment in primary care

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Family Practice, November 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (83rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
10 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
11 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
57 Mendeley
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Title
Feasibility of alcohol screening among patients receiving opioid treatment in primary care
Published in
BMC Family Practice, November 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12875-016-0548-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anne Marie Henihan, Geoff McCombe, Jan Klimas, Davina Swan, Dorothy Leahy, Rolande Anderson, Gerard Bury, Colum P. Dunne, Eamon Keenan, John S. Lambert, David Meagher, Clodagh O’Gorman, Tom P. O’Toole, Jean Saunders, Gillian W. Shorter, Bobby P. Smyth, Eileen Kaner, Walter Cullen

Abstract

Identifying and treating problem alcohol use among people who also use illicit drugs is a challenge. Primary care is well placed to address this challenge but there are several barriers which may prevent this occurring. The objective of this study was to determine if a complex intervention designed to support screening and brief intervention for problem alcohol use among people receiving opioid agonist treatment is feasible and acceptable to healthcare providers and their patients in a primary care setting. A randomised, controlled, pre-and-post design measured feasibility and acceptability of alcohol screening based on recruitment and retention rates among patients and practices. Efficacy was measured by screening and brief intervention rates and the proportion of patients with problem alcohol use. Of 149 practices that were invited, 19 (12.8 %) agreed to participate. At follow up, 13 (81.3 %) practices with 81 (62.8 %) patients were retained. Alcohol screening rates in the intervention group were higher at follow up than in the control group (53 % versus 26 %) as were brief intervention rates (47 % versus 19 %). Four (18 %) people reduced their problem drinking (measured by AUDIT-C), compared to two (7 %) in the control group. Alcohol screening among people receiving opioid agonist treatment in primary care seems feasible. A definitive trial is needed. Such a trial would require over sampling and greater support for participating practices to allow for challenges in recruitment of patients and practices.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 57 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 57 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 14 25%
Researcher 12 21%
Other 5 9%
Student > Master 4 7%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 7%
Other 8 14%
Unknown 10 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 19 33%
Social Sciences 7 12%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 12%
Psychology 4 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 4%
Other 7 12%
Unknown 11 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 17. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 August 2017.
All research outputs
#1,255,099
of 16,324,751 outputs
Outputs from BMC Family Practice
#137
of 1,649 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#33,927
of 295,386 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Family Practice
#21
of 128 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,324,751 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,649 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 295,386 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 128 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.