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An integrated risk and vulnerability assessment framework for climate change and malaria transmission in East Africa

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, November 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (71st percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (79th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
34 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
189 Mendeley
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Title
An integrated risk and vulnerability assessment framework for climate change and malaria transmission in East Africa
Published in
Malaria Journal, November 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12936-016-1600-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Esther Achieng Onyango, Oz Sahin, Alex Awiti, Cordia Chu, Brendan Mackey

Abstract

Malaria is one of the key research concerns in climate change-health relationships. Numerous risk assessments and modelling studies provide evidence that the transmission range of malaria will expand with rising temperatures, adversely impacting on vulnerable communities in the East African highlands. While there exist multiple lines of evidence for the influence of climate change on malaria transmission, there is insufficient understanding of the complex and interdependent factors that determine the risk and vulnerability of human populations at the community level. Moreover, existing studies have had limited focus on the nature of the impacts on vulnerable communities or how well they are prepared to cope. In order to address these gaps, a systems approach was used to present an integrated risk and vulnerability assessment framework for studies of community level risk and vulnerability to malaria due to climate change. Drawing upon published literature on existing frameworks, a systems approach was applied to characterize the factors influencing the interactions between climate change and malaria transmission. This involved structural analysis to determine influential, relay, dependent and autonomous variables in order to construct a detailed causal loop conceptual model that illustrates the relationships among key variables. An integrated assessment framework that considers indicators of both biophysical and social vulnerability was proposed based on the conceptual model. A major conclusion was that this integrated assessment framework can be implemented using Bayesian Belief Networks, and applied at a community level using both quantitative and qualitative methods with stakeholder engagement. The approach enables a robust assessment of community level risk and vulnerability to malaria, along with contextually relevant and targeted adaptation strategies for dealing with malaria transmission that incorporate both scientific and community perspectives.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 189 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Unknown 186 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 36 19%
Researcher 29 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 26 14%
Student > Bachelor 18 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 12 6%
Other 23 12%
Unknown 45 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 23 12%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 17 9%
Social Sciences 17 9%
Medicine and Dentistry 15 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 14 7%
Other 54 29%
Unknown 49 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 December 2017.
All research outputs
#5,236,129
of 21,724,962 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#1,316
of 5,379 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#70,405
of 252,452 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#114
of 559 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,724,962 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 75th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,379 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 252,452 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 559 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.