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Postprandial lipemic and inflammatory responses to high-fat meals: a review of the roles of acute and chronic exercise

Overview of attention for article published in Nutrition & Metabolism, November 2016
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (55th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

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34 Dimensions

Readers on

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96 Mendeley
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Title
Postprandial lipemic and inflammatory responses to high-fat meals: a review of the roles of acute and chronic exercise
Published in
Nutrition & Metabolism, November 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12986-016-0142-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Colby S. Teeman, Stephanie P. Kurti, Brooke J. Cull, Sam R. Emerson, Mark D. Haub, Sara K. Rosenkranz

Abstract

Postprandial lipemia is an independent risk factor for development of cardiovascular disease. Postprandial inflammation following the prolonged elevation of triglycerides occurring subsequent to ingestion of high-fat meals, provides a likely explanation for increased disease risk. Substantial evidence has shown that acute exercise is an effective modality for attenuation of postprandial lipemia following a high-fat meal. However, much of the evidence pertaining to exercise intensity, duration, and overall energy expenditure for reducing postprandial lipemia is inconsistent. The effects of these different exercise variables on postprandial inflammation is largely unknown. Long-term, frequent exercise, however, appears to effectively reduce systemic inflammation, especially in at-risk or diseased individuals. With regard to an acute postprandial response, without a recent bout of exercise, high levels of chronic exercise do not appear to reduce postprandial lipemia. This review summarizes the current literature on postprandial and inflammatory responses to high-fat meals, and the roles that both acute and chronic exercise play. This review may be valuable for health professionals who wish to provide evidence-based, pragmatic advice for reducing postprandial lipemia and cardiovascular disease risk for their patients. A brief review of proposed mechanisms explaining how high-fat meals may result in pro-inflammatory and pro-atherosclerotic environments is also included.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 96 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 96 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 18 19%
Student > Bachelor 15 16%
Student > Master 13 14%
Student > Postgraduate 8 8%
Researcher 7 7%
Other 13 14%
Unknown 22 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 19 20%
Medicine and Dentistry 12 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 11 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 7%
Other 9 9%
Unknown 30 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 January 2018.
All research outputs
#6,992,564
of 21,548,131 outputs
Outputs from Nutrition & Metabolism
#463
of 913 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#145,563
of 417,597 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nutrition & Metabolism
#38
of 77 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,548,131 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 913 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 24.1. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 417,597 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 77 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.