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Feasibility trial of a scalable psychological intervention for women affected by urban adversity and gender-based violence in Nairobi

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Psychiatry, November 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (86th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (82nd percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
16 tweeters

Citations

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19 Dimensions

Readers on

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156 Mendeley
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Title
Feasibility trial of a scalable psychological intervention for women affected by urban adversity and gender-based violence in Nairobi
Published in
BMC Psychiatry, November 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12888-016-1117-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Katie S. Dawson, Alison Schafer, Dorothy Anjuri, Lincoln Ndogoni, Caroline Musyoki, Marit Sijbrandij, Mark van Ommeren, Richard A. Bryant

Abstract

Living in conditions of chronic adversity renders many women more vulnerable to experiencing gender-based violence (GBV). In addition to GBV's physical and social consequences, the psychological effects can be pervasive. Access to evidence-based psychological interventions that seek to support the mental health of women affected by such adversity is rare in low- and middle-income countries. The current study evaluates a brief evidence-informed psychological intervention developed by the World Health Organization for adults impacted by adversity (Problem Management Plus; PM+). A feasibility randomised control trial (RCT) was conducted to inform a fully powered trial. Community health workers delivered the intervention to 70 women residing in three peri-urban settings in Nairobi, Kenya. Women, among whom 80% were survivors of GBV (N = 56), were randomised to receive five sessions of either PM+ (n = 35) by community health workers or enhanced treatment as usual (ETAU; n = 35). PM+ was not associated with any adverse events. Although the study was not powered to identify effects and accordingly did not identify effects on the primary outcome measure of general psychological distress, women survivors of adversity, including GBV, who received PM+ displayed greater reductions in posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms following treatment than those receiving ETAU. This feasibility study suggests that PM+ delivered by lay health workers is an acceptable and safe intervention to reach women experiencing common mental disorders and be inclusive for those affected by GBV and can be studied in a RCT in this setting. The study sets the stage for a fully powered, definitive controlled trial to assess this potentially effective intervention. ACTRN12614001291673 , 10/12/2014, retrospectively registered during the recruitment phase.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 16 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 156 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 156 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 24 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 23 15%
Researcher 21 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 18 12%
Student > Bachelor 13 8%
Other 26 17%
Unknown 31 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 50 32%
Medicine and Dentistry 23 15%
Nursing and Health Professions 15 10%
Social Sciences 15 10%
Neuroscience 5 3%
Other 11 7%
Unknown 37 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 12. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 November 2018.
All research outputs
#2,086,028
of 19,153,137 outputs
Outputs from BMC Psychiatry
#760
of 3,993 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#55,645
of 408,677 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Psychiatry
#70
of 384 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,153,137 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,993 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.2. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 408,677 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 384 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.