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The epidemiology of pre-hospital potential spinal cord injuries in Victoria, Australia: a six year retrospective cohort study

Overview of attention for article published in Injury Epidemiology, October 2016
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Title
The epidemiology of pre-hospital potential spinal cord injuries in Victoria, Australia: a six year retrospective cohort study
Published in
Injury Epidemiology, October 2016
DOI 10.1186/s40621-016-0089-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ala’a O. Oteir, Karen Smith, Johannes U. Stoelwinder, Shelley Cox, James W. Middleton, Paul A. Jennings

Abstract

Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury (TSCI) is relatively uncommon, yet a devastating and costly condition. Despite the human and social impacts, studies describing patients with potential TSCI in the pre-hospital setting are scarce. This paper aims to describe the epidemiology of patients potentially at risk of or suspected to have a TSCI by paramedics, with a view to providing a better understanding of factors associated with potential TSCI. This is a retrospective cohort study of all adult patients managed and transported by Ambulance Victoria (AV) between 01 January 2007 and 31 December 2012 who, based on meeting pre-hospital triage protocols and criteria for spinal clearance, paramedic suspicion or spinal immobilisation, were classified to be at risk of or suspected to have a TSCI. Data was extracted from the AV data warehouse, including demographic details, trauma aetiology, paramedic assessment, management and other event characteristics. A total of 106,059cases were included in the study, representing 2.3 % of all emergency transports by AV. Subjects had a median age of 51 years (interquartile range; 29-78) and 52.4 % were males (95 % CI 52-52.7). Males were significantly younger than females (M: 43 years [26-65] vs. F: 64 years [36-84], p =0.001). Falls and traffic accidents were the leading causes of injuries, comprising 46.9 and 39.4 % of cases, respectively. Other causes included accidents due to sport, animals, industrial work and diving, as well as violence and hanging. 29.9 % of patients were transported to a Major Trauma Service (MTS). A proportion of 48.8 % of the study population met the Pre-hospital Major Trauma criteria. This is the first study to describe the epidemiology of potential TSCI in Australia and is based on a large, state-wide sample. It provides background knowledge and a baseline for future research, as well as a reference point for future in policy. Falling and traffic related injuries were the leading causes of potential SCI. Future research is required to identify the proportion of confirmed TSCI among the potentials and factors associated with TSCI in prehospital settings.

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 38 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 3%
Unknown 37 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 18%
Student > Postgraduate 6 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 13%
Researcher 5 13%
Student > Bachelor 4 11%
Other 4 11%
Unknown 7 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 14 37%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 18%
Social Sciences 1 3%
Decision Sciences 1 3%
Sports and Recreations 1 3%
Other 4 11%
Unknown 10 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 November 2016.
All research outputs
#6,603,316
of 8,670,160 outputs
Outputs from Injury Epidemiology
#73
of 78 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#204,119
of 296,426 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Injury Epidemiology
#7
of 7 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,670,160 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 78 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 17.2. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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