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Of flies and men: insights on organismal metabolism from fruit flies

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Biology, April 2013
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Title
Of flies and men: insights on organismal metabolism from fruit flies
Published in
BMC Biology, April 2013
DOI 10.1186/1741-7007-11-38
Pubmed ID
Authors

Akhila Rajan, Norbert Perrimon

Abstract

The fruit fly Drosophila has contributed significantly to our general understanding of the basic principles of signaling, cell and developmental biology, and neurobiology. However, answers to questions pertaining to energy metabolism have been so far mostly addressed in more complex model organisms such as mice. We review in this article recent studies that show how the genetic tractability and simplicity of Drosophila are being used to identify novel regulatory mechanisms at the organismal level, and to query the co-ordination between energy metabolism and other processes such as neurodegeneration, circadian rhythms, immunity, and tumor biology.

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The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 11 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 202 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 3 1%
United States 2 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
Belgium 1 <1%
Unknown 195 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 61 30%
Researcher 42 21%
Student > Master 22 11%
Student > Bachelor 14 7%
Professor > Associate Professor 13 6%
Other 24 12%
Unknown 26 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 104 51%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 46 23%
Neuroscience 10 5%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 1%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 <1%
Other 12 6%
Unknown 25 12%