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Comparative analysis of Streptococcus pneumoniaetransmission in Portuguese and Finnish day-care centres

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, April 2013
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Title
Comparative analysis of Streptococcus pneumoniaetransmission in Portuguese and Finnish day-care centres
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, April 2013
DOI 10.1186/1471-2334-13-180
Pubmed ID
Authors

Delphine Pessoa, Fabian Hoti, Ritva Syrjänen, Raquel Sá-Leão, Tarja Kaijalainen, M Gabriela M Gomes, Kari Auranen

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Day care centre (DCC) attendees play a central role in maintaining the circulation of Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) in the population. The prevalence of pneumococcal carriage is highest in DCC attendees but varies across countries and is found to be consistently lower in Finland than in Portugal. We compared key parameters underlying pneumococcal transmission in DCCs to understand which of these contributed to the observed differences in carriage prevalence. METHODS: Longitudinal data about serotype-specific carriage in DCC attendees in Portugal (47 children in three rooms; mean age 2 years; range 1--3 years) and Finland (91 children in seven rooms; mean age 4 years; range 1--7 years) were analysed with a continuous-time event history model in a Bayesian framework. The monthly rates of within-room transmission, community acquisition and clearing carriage were estimated. RESULTS: The posterior mean of within-room transmission rate was 1.05 per month (Portugal) vs. 0.63 per month (Finland). The smaller rate of clearance in Portugal (0.57 vs. 0.73 per month) is in accordance with the children being younger. The overall community rate of acquisition was larger in the Portuguese setting (0.25 vs. 0.11 per month), in agreement with that the groups belonged to a larger DCC. The model adequately predicted the observed levels of carriage prevalence and longitudinal patterns in carriage acquisition and clearance. CONCLUSIONS: The difference in prevalence of carriage (61% in Portuguese vs. 26% among Finnish DCC attendees) was assigned to the longer duration of carriage in younger attendees and a significantly higher rate of within-room transmission and community acquisition in the Portuguese setting.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 39 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 3%
Unknown 38 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 28%
Researcher 6 15%
Student > Master 6 15%
Student > Bachelor 4 10%
Student > Postgraduate 2 5%
Other 3 8%
Unknown 7 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 26%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 26%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 8%
Psychology 2 5%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 5%
Other 4 10%
Unknown 8 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 April 2013.
All research outputs
#20,190,878
of 22,707,247 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#6,432
of 7,650 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#172,225
of 197,463 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#110
of 140 outputs
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