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Factors associated with the use of supplemental oxygen or positive pressure ventilation in the delivery room, in infants born with a gestational age ≥ 34 weeks

Overview of attention for article published in Reproductive Health, October 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (62nd percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

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50 Mendeley
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Title
Factors associated with the use of supplemental oxygen or positive pressure ventilation in the delivery room, in infants born with a gestational age ≥ 34 weeks
Published in
Reproductive Health, October 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12978-016-0235-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Maria Elisabeth Moreira, Ana Paula Esteves Pereira, Saint Clair Gomes Junior, Ruth Guinsburg, Maria Fernanda Branco de Almeida, Silvana Granado Gama, Maria do Carmo Leal

Abstract

Approximately 5-10 % of newborns require some form of resuscitationupon delivery; several factors, such as maternal abnormal conditions, gestational age and type of delivery could be responsible for this trend. This study aimed to describe the factors associated with the need for positive pressure ventilation (PPV) via a mask or endotracheal tube and the use of supplemental O2 in newborns with a gestational age greater than 34 weeks in Brazil. We performed a cross-sectional study and obtained data from the Birth in Brazil Survey. The inclusion criterion was a gestational age ≥34 weeks. Exclusion criteria were newborns with congenital malformations, and cases with undetermined gestational age or type of delivery (vaginal, pre labor cesarean section and cesarean section during labor). The primary outcomes were need of PPV via a mask or endotracheal tube and the use of supplemental oxygen without PPV. Confounding variables, including maternal age, source of birth payment, years of maternal schooling, previous birth, newborn presentation, multiple pregnancy, and maternal obstetric risk, were analyzed. We included 22,720 newborns. Of these, 2974 (13.1 %) required supplementary oxygen. PPV with a bag and mask was used for 727 (3.2 %) newborns and tracheal intubation for 192 (0.8 %) newborns. Chest compression was necessary for 136 (0.6 %) newborns and drugs administered in 114 (0.5 %). 51.3 % of newborns were delivered by cesarean section, with the majority of cesarean sections (88.7 %) being performed prior to labor. Gestational age (late preterm infants: (Relative Risk-(RR) 2.46; 95 % (Confidence interval-CI 1.79-3.39), maternal obstetric risk (RR 1.59; 95 % CI1.30-1.94), and maternal age of 12-19 years old (RR 1.36; 95 % CI1.06-1.74) contributed to rates of PPV in the logistic regression analysis. Newborns aged between 37-38 weeks of gestaional age weren´t less likely to require PPV compared with those aged 39-41 weeks of gestational age. Late preterm infants, previous maternal obstetric risks and maternal age contributed to the higher needs of PPV and use of O2 in the delivery room. These variables need to be considered in planning care in the delivery room.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 50 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 50 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 6 12%
Researcher 6 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 10%
Student > Bachelor 4 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 8%
Other 10 20%
Unknown 15 30%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 18 36%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 12%
Psychology 2 4%
Decision Sciences 2 4%
Energy 1 2%
Other 3 6%
Unknown 18 36%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 November 2016.
All research outputs
#3,537,429
of 8,696,028 outputs
Outputs from Reproductive Health
#306
of 554 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#109,752
of 298,947 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Reproductive Health
#12
of 22 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,696,028 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 59th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 554 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.7. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 298,947 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 22 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.