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Collapse of an iconic conifer: long-term changes in the demography of Widdringtonia cedarbergensis using repeat photography

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Ecology, November 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (87th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (74th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
8 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
10 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
28 Mendeley
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Title
Collapse of an iconic conifer: long-term changes in the demography of Widdringtonia cedarbergensis using repeat photography
Published in
BMC Ecology, November 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12898-016-0108-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

J. D. M. White, S. L. Jack, M. T. Hoffman, J. Puttick, D. Bonora, V. Visser, E. C. February

Abstract

Conifer populations appear disproportionately threatened by global change. Most examples are, however, drawn from the northern hemisphere and long-term rates of population decline are not well documented as historical data are often lacking. We use a large and long-term (1931-2013) repeat photography dataset together with environmental data and fire records to account for the decline of the critically endangered Widdringtonia cedarbergensis. Eighty-seven historical and repeat photo-pairs were analysed to establish 20th century changes in W. cedarbergensis demography. A generalized linear mixed-effects model was fitted to determine the relative importance of environmental factors and fire-return interval on mortality for the species. From an initial total of 1313 live trees in historical photographs, 74% had died and only 44 (3.4%) had recruited in the repeat photographs, leaving 387 live individuals. Juveniles (mature adults) had decreased (increased) from 27% (73%) to 8% (92%) over the intervening period. Our model demonstrates that mortality is related to greater fire frequency, higher temperatures, lower elevations, less rocky habitats and aspect (i.e. east-facing slopes had the least mortality). Our results show that W. cedarbergensis populations have declined significantly over the recorded period, with a pronounced decline in the last 30 years. Individuals that established in open habitats at lower, hotter elevations and experienced a greater fire frequency appear to be more vulnerable to mortality than individuals growing within protected, rocky environments at higher, cooler locations with less frequent fires. Climate models predict increasing temperatures for our study area (and likely increases in wildfires). If these predictions are realised, further declines in the species can be expected. Urgent management interventions, including seedling out-planting in fire-protected high elevation sites, reducing fire frequency in higher elevation populations, and assisted migration, should be considered.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 28 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 28 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 9 32%
Student > Master 5 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 14%
Student > Postgraduate 3 11%
Other 2 7%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 5 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 9 32%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 32%
Computer Science 1 4%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 1 4%
Social Sciences 1 4%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 7 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 14. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 July 2020.
All research outputs
#1,828,589
of 19,471,971 outputs
Outputs from BMC Ecology
#92
of 417 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#49,295
of 410,010 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Ecology
#12
of 43 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,471,971 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 417 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.2. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 410,010 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 43 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.